Creating Artwork for a T-Shirt - Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book 2015 release (2016) 

Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book 2015 release (2016)

13. Creating Artwork for a T-Shirt

Lesson overview

In this lesson, you’ll learn how to do the following:

• Work with existing symbols.

• Create, modify, and redefine a symbol.

• Store and retrieve artwork in the Symbols panel.

• Understand Creative Cloud Libraries.

• Work with Creative Cloud Libraries.

• Understand perspective drawing.

• Use grid presets and adjust the grid.

• Draw and transform content in perspective.

• Edit grid planes and content.

• Create text and bring it into perspective.

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This lesson takes approximately 60 minutes to complete.

Download the project files for this lesson from the Lesson & Update Files tab on your Account page at www.peachpit.com and store them on your computer in a convenient location, as described in the “Getting Started” section of this book.

Your Account page is also where you’ll find any updates to the chapters or to the lesson files. Look on the Lesson & Update Files tab to access the most current content.

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In this lesson, you’ll explore a variety of useful concepts, including using symbols and the Symbols panel, working with Libraries to make your design assets available anywhere, and finally understanding how to work with the perspective grid to render artwork in perspective.

Getting started

In this lesson, you’ll explore several concepts such as symbols, the Libraries panel, and working with the perspective grid by creating artwork for a T-shirt. Before you begin, you’ll restore the default preferences for Adobe Illustrator. Then, you’ll open the finished art file for this lesson to see what you’ll create.

1. To ensure that the tools and panels function exactly as described in this lesson, delete or deactivate (by renaming) the Adobe Illustrator CC preferences file. See “Restoring default preferences” in the “Getting Started” section at the beginning of the book.


Image Note

If you have not already downloaded the project files for this lesson to your computer from your Account page, make sure to do so now. See the “Getting Started” section at the beginning of this book.


2. Start Adobe Illustrator CC.

3. Choose File > Open, and open the L13_end.ai file in the Lessons > Lesson13 folder on your hard disk.

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You are going to create artwork for a T-shirt design.


Image Note

If the Missing Fonts dialog box appears, click Close.


4. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window and leave the file open for reference, or choose File > Close.

5. Choose File > Open. If a panel appears, click Open in the panel. You could also choose File > Open again. In the Open dialog box, navigate to the Lessons > Lesson13 folder and select the L13_start.ai file on your hard disk. Click Open to open the file.

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6. Choose View > Fit All In Window.

7. Choose File > Save As. In the Save As dialog box, navigate to the Lesson13 folder, and name the file TShirt.ai. Leave the Format option set to Adobe Illustrator (ai) (Mac OS) or the Save As Type option set to Adobe Illustrator (*.AI) (Windows), and then click Save.

8. In the Illustrator Options dialog box, leave the Illustrator options at their default settings, and then click OK.

9. Choose Reset Essentials from the workspace switcher in the Application bar.


Image Note

If you don’t see Reset Essentials in the menu, choose Window > Workspace > Essentials before choosing Window > Workspace > Reset Essentials.


Working with symbols

symbol is a reusable art object that is stored in the Symbols panel (Window > Symbols). For example, if you create a symbol from a fish you drew, you can then quickly add multiple instances of that fish symbol to your artwork, which saves you from having to draw each fish again. All instances in the document are linked to the original symbol in the Symbols panel. When you edit the original symbol, all instances of the fish that are linked to it are updated. You can turn that fish from blue to green instantly! Not only do symbols save time, but they also greatly reduce file size.

Click the Symbols panel icon (Image) on the right side of the workspace. The different options available in the Symbols panel are described here:

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A. Symbol thumbnail
B. Symbol Libraries Menu
C. Place Symbol Instance
D. Break Link To Symbol
E. Symbol Options
F. New Symbol
G. Delete Symbol


Image Note

The figure shows the default Symbols panel with a print document displaying in the Document window.


Illustrator comes with a series of symbol libraries, which range from tiki icons to hair to web icons. You can access those symbol libraries in the Symbols panel or by choosing Window > Symbol Libraries and easily incorporate them into your own artwork.

Using existing Illustrator symbol libraries

You will start by adding a symbol from an existing symbol library to the artwork.

1. Open the Artboards panel by choosing Window > Artboards. Double-click the “2” to the left of the name “T-Shirt” to show the middle artboard.

2. Choose View > Smart Guides to deselect (turn off) the Smart Guides.

3. Click the Layers panel tab to show the Layers panel. Click the Content layer to make sure it is selected. Make sure that both of the layers are collapsed by clicking the disclosure triangles to the left of the layer names (if necessary).

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When adding symbols to a document, the layer that is selected when they are added is the same layer they become a part of.

4. Click the Symbols panel icon (Image) on the right side of the workspace to show the panel.

5. In the Symbols panel, click the Symbol Libraries Menu button (Image) at the bottom of the panel, and choose Tiki.

The Tiki library opens as a free-floating panel. This library is external to the file that you are working on, but you can import any of the symbols into the document and use them in the artwork.

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6. Position the pointer over the symbols in the Tiki panel to see their names as tooltips. Click the symbol named “Guitar” to add it to the Symbols panel for the document. Close the Tiki panel.

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Image Tip

If you want to see the symbol names along with the symbol pictures, click the Symbols panel menu icon (Image), and then choose Small List View or Large List View.


Every document has a default set of symbols in the Symbols panel. When you add symbols to the panel, as you just did, they are saved with the active document only.

7. Using the Selection tool (Image), drag the Guitar symbol from the Symbols panel onto the artboard into the center of the black T-shirt. Do this twice to create two instances of the guitar on the T-shirt.


Image Tip

You can also copy a symbol instance on the artboard and paste as many as you need. This is the same as dragging a symbol instance out of the Symbols panel onto the artboard.


Each time you drag a symbol onto the artboard, an instance of the Guitar symbol is created. Next, you will resize one of the symbol instances on the page.

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8. Click to select the Guitar instance on the right, if it’s not already selected. Shift-drag the upper-right bounding point of the selected Guitar symbol instance toward the center to make it a little smaller, while constraining its proportions. Release the mouse button, and then release the Shift key.

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Image Note

Although you can transform symbol instances in many ways, specific properties of instances from static symbols like the guitar cannot be edited. For example, the fill color is locked because it is controlled by the original symbol in the Symbols panel.


A symbol instance is treated like a group of objects and can have only certain transformation and appearance properties changed (such as scale, rotate, move, transparency, etc). You cannot edit the individual artwork that makes up an instance without breaking the link to the original symbol. With the symbol instance still selected on the artboard, notice that, in the Control panel, you see the word “Symbol” and symbol-related options.

9. With the same instance still selected, choose Object > Transform > Reflect. In the Reflect dialog box, select Vertical, and then select Preview. Click OK.

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Editing a symbol

In this next section, you will edit the Guitar symbol, and all instances in the document will be updated. There are several ways to edit a symbol, and in this section you will focus on one.

1. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, double-click the Guitar symbol instance you just resized. A warning dialog box appears, stating that you are about to edit the original symbol and that all instances will update. Click OK to continue.


Image Tip

Another way to edit a symbol is to select the symbol instance on the artboard, and then click the Edit Symbol button in the Control panel.


This takes you into Symbol Editing mode, so you can’t edit any other objects on the page. The Guitar symbol instance you double-clicked will appear larger and will no longer be reflected. That’s because in Symbol Editing mode, you are looking at the original symbol artwork. You can now edit the artwork that makes up the symbol.

2. Select the Zoom tool (Image), and drag across the symbol content to zoom in closely.

3. Select the Direct Selection tool (Image), and click to select the blue neck of the guitar artwork. See the figure.


Image Note

It may be difficult to select the shape. You may want to zoom in closer.


4. Change the Fill color to the brown swatch with the tooltip “C=30 M=50 Y=75 K=10” in the Control panel.

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5. Double-click away from the symbol content, or click the Exit Symbol Editing Mode button (Image) in the upper-left corner of the artboard until you exit Symbol Editing mode so that you can edit the rest of the content.

6. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window, and notice that both of the Guitar symbol instances on the artboard have been changed.

Working with dynamic symbols

As you just saw, editing a symbol updates all of the instances in your document. Symbols can also be dynamic, which means you can change certain appearance properties of instances using the Direct Selection tool (Image) without editing the original symbol. In this section, you’ll edit the properties of the Guitar symbol so that it is dynamic, and then you’ll edit each instance separately.

1. In the Symbols panel, click the Guitar symbol thumbnail to select it, if it’s not already selected. Click the Symbol Options button (Image) at the bottom of the Symbols panel.

2. In the Symbol Options dialog box, select Dynamic Symbol, and click OK. The symbol and its instances are now dynamic.

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Image Tip

You can tell if a symbol is dynamic by looking at the thumbnail in the Symbols panel. If there is a small plus (+) in the lower-right corner of the thumbnail, it is a dynamic symbol.


3. Select the Zoom tool (Image), and drag across the symbol content (guitars) to zoom in.

4. Select the Direct Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Click to select the larger body shape of the guitar instance on the right.

With part of the symbol selected, notice the words “Symbol (Dynamic)” on the left end of the Control panel telling you it’s a dynamic symbol.

5. Change the Fill color to the lighter brown swatch with the tooltip “C=25 M=40 Y=65 K=0” in the Swatches panel (Window > Swatches).


Image Tip

After making edits to a dynamic symbol instance with the Direct Selection tool, you can reselect the entire instance with the Selection tool and click Reset in the Control panel to reset the appearance to the same as the original symbol.


Try clicking some of the other blue parts of the same guitar and changing their fill as well.

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6. Select the Selection tool (Image), and double-click the guitar on the right again to edit the original symbol. Click OK in the dialog box that appears.

7. In Symbol Editing mode, click the guitar, and choose Object > Ungroup.

8. Choose Select > Deselect.

9. Select the larger shape at the top of the guitar. Drag the top-middle bounding point up a bit to make it taller.

10. Double-click away from the symbol content, or click the Exit Symbol Editing Mode button (Image) in the upper-left corner of the artboard until you exit Symbol Editing mode so that you can see the change.

You’ll see that the top shape changed for both symbol instances, but the color is still different.

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Image Note

The guitar on the right might look different than yours, and that’s okay. I changed the fill for all the blue shapes in a previous step using the Direct Selection tool and the Swatches panel.



Symbol Options

In the Symbol Options dialog box, you will encounter several options. These options are briefly described here:

• Export Type: Movie Clip is the default symbol type in Flash and in Illustrator. This option will not affect the artwork while in Illustrator. If the artwork is imported from Flash or exported for use in Flash, a movie-clip symbol in Flash can contain reusable animation, while a graphic symbol in Flash will remain static.

• Dynamic Symbol: Selecting this option allows for local appearance overrides in dynamic symbol instances, but the relation with the master symbol is left intact.

• Static Symbol: Selecting this option does not allow for local appearance overrides; only certain operations are possible like transformations, opacity, and more.

• Specify a location on the Registration grid where you want to set the symbol’s anchor point. The location of the anchor point affects the position of the symbol within the screen coordinates.

• Select Enable Guides For 9-Slice Scaling if you want to utilize 9-Slice scaling in Illustrator or Flash.

—From Illustrator Help


Creating a symbol

Illustrator also lets you create your own symbols. You can make symbols from objects, including paths, compound paths, text, embedded (not linked) raster images, mesh objects, and groups of objects. Symbols can even include active objects, such as brush strokes, blends, effects, or other symbol instances.

Next, you’ll create your own symbol from existing artwork.

1. Choose 3 Symbol Artwork from the Artboard menu in the lower-left corner of the Document window.

2. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, click the top “musical note” shape on the artboard to select it.

3. Click the New Symbol button (Image) at the bottom of the Symbols panel to make a symbol from the selected artwork.

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Image Tip

You can also drag the selected content into a blank area of the Symbols panel to create a symbol.


4. In the Symbol Options dialog box, change the name to Note1, and choose Graphic as Export Type. Ensure that Dynamic Symbol is also selected, just in case you want to edit the appearance of one of the instances later. Click OK to create the symbol.

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Image Tip

By default, the selected artwork becomes an instance of the new symbol. If you don’t want the artwork to become an instance of the symbol, press the Shift key as you create the new symbol.


In the Symbol Options dialog box, you’ll see a note that explains that there is no difference between a movie clip and a graphic type in Illustrator, and so if you do not plan on exporting this content to Adobe Flash, you don’t need to worry about choosing an export type.

After creating the symbol, the “Note” artwork on the artboard is converted to an instance of the Note1 symbol. The symbol also appears in the Symbols panel.

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Image Tip

You can drag the symbol thumbnails in the Symbols panel to change their ordering. Reordering symbols in the Symbols panel has no effect on the artwork. It can simply be a way to organize your symbols.


5. Delete the original “Note” artwork on the artboard.

6. Choose 2 T-Shirt from the Artboard menu in the lower-left corner of the Document window.

7. Drag the Note1 symbol from the Symbols panel onto the artboard four times, and position the instances around the guitars like you see in the following figure.

8. Try resizing a few of the Note1 instances on the artboard like you did earlier (the figure shows the result after I resized a few).

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9. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Duplicating symbols

Often you will want to add a series of symbol instances to your artwork. After all, one of the reasons why you use symbols is for storing and updating frequently used content like trees or clouds. In this section, you’ll create, add, and duplicate a symbol that happens to be another musical note.

1. Choose 3 Symbol Artwork from the Artboard menu in the lower-left corner of the Document window.

2. Using the Selection tool (Image), click and drag the bottom “musical note” shape from the artboard into a blank area of the Symbols panel to create a new symbol. In the Symbol Options dialog box, change the name to Note2, and choose Graphic as the Export Type. Leave the remaining settings at their defaults, and click OK to create the symbol.

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3. Delete the original note artwork on the artboard.

4. Choose 2 T-Shirt from the Artboard menu in the lower-left corner of the Document window.

5. Drag one instance of the Note2 symbol from the Symbols panel onto the T-shirt, near the other notes.

6. Press Option (Mac OS) or Alt (Windows), and drag the Note2 symbol instance on the artboard to create a copy. When the new instance is in position (see the figure), release the mouse button, and then release the modifier key.

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Image Note

Your symbol instance may not be in the same position on the artboard, and that’s fine. You will reposition them shortly anyway.


7. Create a few more copies by pressing Option (Mac OS) or Alt (Windows) and dragging any of the note symbol instances. Drag them around the guitars and position them how you like. Know that later you will create artwork to go behind the guitars and cover the area between the guitars.

8. Resize a few of the symbol instances, making some smaller and some a bit larger, so they look different from each other.

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9. Choose File > Save.

Replacing symbols

You can easily replace a symbol instance in the document with another symbol. Next, you will replace a few of the note symbol instances.

1. With the Selection tool (Image), select one of the Note2 symbol instances on the artboard.

When you select a symbol instance, you can tell which symbol it came from by looking for “Instance Of: Note2” in the Control panel. Also, in the Symbols panel, the symbol for the selected instance is highlighted (has a border around it).

2. In the Control panel, click the arrow to the right of the Replace Instance With Symbol field to open a panel showing the symbols in the Symbols panel. Click the Note1 symbol in the panel.


Image Note

This option does not work for symbols in perspective.


If the original symbol instance you were replacing had a transformation applied, such as a rotation, the symbol instance replacing it would have the same transformations applied.

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3. Double-click the Note2 symbol thumbnail in the Symbols panel to edit the symbol.

A temporary instance of the symbol appears in the center of the Document window. Editing a symbol by double-clicking the symbol in the Symbols panel hides all artboard content except the symbol artwork. This is just another way to edit a symbol.

4. Press Command++ (Mac OS) or Ctrl++ (Windows) several times to zoom in.

5. Select the Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and click the note shape.

6. Change the Fill color in the Control panel to the light gray swatch with the tooltip that shows “C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=40.”

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Image Note

The color of the path selection you see may be different than what shows in the figure, and that’s okay.


7. Double-click away from the symbol content to exit Symbol Editing mode so that you can edit the rest of the content.

8. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

9. Select the Selection tool (Image), and click one of the note symbol instances. It doesn’t matter which symbol (Note1 or Note 2) it is. Choose Select > Same > Symbol Instance.

This is a great way to select all instances of a symbol in the document.

10. Choose Object > Group to group the instances of that note symbol together.

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Image Note

If you want to, you can select an instance of the other note symbol on the artboard and group those too. It’s good to practice what you learn, right?


11. Choose Select > Deselect.


Symbol layers

When you edit a symbol using any of the methods described, open the Layers panel, and you will see that the symbol has its own layering.

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Similar to working with groups in Isolation mode, you see the layers associated with that symbol only, not the document’s layers. In the Layers panel, you can rename, add, delete, show/hide, and reorder content for a symbol.


Breaking a link to a symbol

At times, you need to edit specific instances on the artboard. As you’ve learned, you can only make changes, such as scaling, opacity, and flipping, to a symbol instance, and saving the symbol as dynamic only lets you edit certain appearance attributes using the Direct Selection tool. In certain cases you may need to break the link between a symbol and an instance. This breaks the instance into the original artwork on the artboard, and that instance will no longer update if the symbol is edited.

Next, you will break the link to one of the guitar symbol instances.

1. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, click to select the Guitar symbol instance on the left. In the Control panel, click the Break Link button.

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This object is now a series of paths, as indicated by the words “Mixed Objects” on the left side of the Control panel, and can be edited directly. You should be able to see the anchor points of the shapes. This content will no longer update if the Guitar symbol is edited.


Image Tip

You can also break the link to a symbol instance by selecting the symbol instance on the artboard and then clicking the Break Link To Symbol button (Image) at the bottom of the Symbols panel.


2. Select the Zoom tool (Image), and drag across the top of the selected guitar artwork on the artboard to zoom in.

3. Choose Select > Deselect.

4. With the Selection tool selected, click the top small blue circle toward the top of the guitar. Option-drag (Mac OS) or Alt-drag (Windows) the circle up to create a copy. Release the mouse button and the modifier key.

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5. Choose Select > Deselect.

6. Choose File > Save.


The Symbolism Tools

The Symbol Sprayer tool (Image) in the Tools panel allows you to spray symbols on the artboard, creating symbol sets.

A symbol set is a group of symbol instances that you create with the Symbol Sprayer tool. This can be really useful if, for instance, you were to create grass from individual blades of grass. Spraying the blades of grass speeds up this process greatly and makes it much easier to edit individual instances of grass or the sprayed grass as a group. You can create mixed sets of symbol instances by using the Symbol Sprayer tool with one symbol and then using it again with another symbol.

You use the symbolism tools to modify multiple symbol instances in a set. For example, you can disperse instances over a larger area using the Symbol Scruncher tool or gradually tinting the color of instances to make them look more realistic.

Although you can use symbolism tools on individual symbol instances, they are most effective when used on symbol sets. When working with individual symbol instances, most of these tasks are easily accomplished using the tools and commands you use on regular objects.

—From Illustrator Help


Working with Creative Cloud Libraries

Creative Cloud Libraries are an easy way to create and share stored content such as images, colors, text styles, Adobe Stock assets, Creative Cloud Market assets, and more between Adobe Photoshop CC, Adobe Illustrator CC, Adobe InDesign CC, and certain Adobe mobile apps.

Creative Cloud Libraries connects to your Creative Profile, putting the creative assets you care about at your fingertips. When you create vector artwork in Illustrator and save it to a Library, that asset is available to use in all of your Illustrator files. Those assets are automatically synced and can be shared with anyone with a Creative Cloud account. As your creative team works across Adobe desktop and mobile apps, your shared library assets are always up to date and ready to use anywhere.


Image Note

In order to use Creative Cloud Libraries, you will need to be signed in with your Adobe ID and have an Internet connection.


In this section, you’ll explore CC Libraries and use them in your project.

Adding assets to CC Libraries

The first thing you’ll learn about is how to work with the Libraries panel (Window > Libraries) in Illustrator and add assets to it. You’ll open an existing document in Illustrator to capture assets from.

1. Choose File > Open. If a panel appears, click Open in the panel. You could also choose File > Open again. In the Open dialog box, navigate to the Lessons > Lesson13 folder and select the Sample.ai file on your hard disk. Click Open to open the file.


Image Note

The Missing Fonts dialog box may appear. You need an Internet connection to sync the fonts. The syncing process may take a few minutes. Click Sync Fonts to sync all of the missing fonts to your computer. After they are synced and you see the message stating that there are no more missing fonts, click Close. If you have an issue syncing, you can go to Help (Help > Illustrator Help) and search for “Find missing fonts.”


2. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

Using this document, you will capture artwork, colors, and type formatting to be used in the TShirt.ai document.

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3. Choose Window > Libraries to open the Libraries panel.

By default, you have one library to work with called “My Library.” You can add your design assets to the default library, or you can create an unlimited number of Libraries—maybe to save assets according to clients or projects.

4. Choose Select > Deselect.

5. Select the Selection tool (Image), and click the type area that contains the text “The Guitar Company.” In the Libraries panel, click the Add Paragraph Style button to capture the text formatting and save it in the Library.


Image Note

If a paragraph style does not have the font associated with it on the local computer, a warning icon is displayed at the bottom-right corner of the Paragraph Style thumbnail in the Libraries panel.


The paragraph style will be added to the currently selected library. In this case, it is adding it to my default library called “My Library.”

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6. Hover the pointer over the new asset in the Libraries panel, and you’ll see a tooltip that shows the captured formatting. Double-click the name, and change it to Guitar. Press Enter or Return to accept the name change.

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The paragraph and character formatting has now been saved in a paragraph style called “Guitar” in the Libraries panel. If you later apply this formatting to text, a Guitar paragraph style will be added to that document in the Paragraph Styles panel.

7. Click to select the brown guitar shape in the document.

8. In the Libraries panel, click the Add Fill Color button to save the color.

If artwork has a fill and/or stroke, the options at the bottom of the Libraries panel will change. For instance, if selected artwork has no stroke, then the Add Stroke Color button will not appear.

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As you save assets in the Libraries panel, notice how it is organized by asset type. You can change the appearance of the items (icons or list) by clicking the buttons in the upper-right corner of the Libraries panel.

9. Drag across the black shape in the lower-right corner with the text “Guitar” on it to select all of the artwork. Drag the selected artwork into the Libraries panel. When a plus sign (+) and a name (such as “Artwork 1”) appears, release the mouse button to add the graphic.

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Image Tip

You can double-click the name of an asset in the Libraries panel to edit it.


You can also select artwork and click the Add Graphic button (Image) at the bottom of the Libraries panel. The assets you store as a graphic in a Creative Cloud Library retain their vector form. When you reuse a graphic from a Creative Cloud Library in another Illustrator document, it is in vector form.

10. Position the pointer over the new guitar asset, most likely named “Artwork 1” in the Libraries panel. Double-click the name, and change it to Pick. Press Enter or Return to accept the name change.

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11. Choose File > Close to close the Sample.ai file and return to the TShirt.ai file. Don’t save the file if asked.

Notice that the Libraries panel still shows the assets in the default library named “My Library.” The Libraries and their assets are available no matter which document is open in Illustrator.


Image Tip

You can share your Library with others by choosing the Library you want to share in the Libraries panel and then choosing Share Link from the panel menu.


Using Library assets

Now that you have some assets in the Libraries panel, once synced those assets will be available to other applications and apps that support Libraries, as long as you are signed in with the same Creative Cloud account. Next, you will use those assets in the TShirt.ai file.

1. While still on the 2 T-Shirt artboard, choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

2. Select the Type tool, and click in a blank area of the artboard. Type Rock On.

3. Select the Selection tool (Image) and, with the type object still selected, click the Guitar paragraph style thumbnail in the Libraries panel to apply the text formatting.

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4. Choose Window > Type > Paragraph Styles. If a warning dialog appears, click OK.

In the Paragraph Styles panel, notice the new style named “Guitar.”

5. With the type area selected, change the Fill color to white in the Control panel. Change Font Size to 40 pt.

6. Drag the type area onto the black T-shirt below the guitars, like you see in the figure.

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7. Drag the Pick asset from the Libraries panel onto an empty area of the artboard.

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Image Tip

As you’ll learn in the next section, graphics you drag from the Libraries panel are linked. If you Option-drag (Mac OS) or Alt-drag (Windows) the artwork from the Libraries panel into a document, it will be embedded by default.


8. Choose File > Save, and leave the artwork selected.

Later, when you add artwork to the perspective grid, you’ll use the color you saved in the Libraries panel to see how that works.

Updating a Library asset

When you drag a graphic from your library to an Illustrator project, it is automatically placed as a linked asset. If you make a change to a library asset, the linked instances will update in your projects. Next, you’ll see how to update the asset.

1. With the Pick asset still selected on the artboard, look in the upper-left corner of the Control panel. Click the words “Linked File” to open the Links panel.

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In the Links panel that appears, you will see the name of the Pick asset, as well as a cloud icon to the right of the name. The cloud icon indicates that the artwork is a linked Library asset.


Image Note

You’ll learn more about the Links panel in Lesson 14, “Using Illustrator CC with Other Adobe Applications.”


2. Back in the Libraries panel, double-click the Pick asset thumbnail.

The artwork will appear in a new, temporary document.

3. With the Selection tool, click to select the black shape. Change the Fill color to a gray with the tooltip “C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=70” in the Control panel.

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4. Choose File > Save, and then choose File > Close.

In the Libraries panel, the graphic thumbnail should update to reflect the appearance change you made.

5. Back in the TShirt.ai document, the pick graphic on the artboard should have updated. If it hasn’t, with the pick artwork still selected on the artboard, click the Linked File link in the Control panel. In the Links panel, with the Pick row selected, click the Update Link button (Image) at the bottom of the panel.

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6. With the artwork still selected, click the Embed button in the Control panel.

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The artwork is no longer linked to the original Library item and will not update if the Pick library item is updated. That also means it is not directly editable in the document. Just know that Libraries panel artwork that is embedded after it has been placed will typically have a clipping mask applied.

7. With the Selection tool, Shift-drag the corner of the pick artwork to make it smaller. Drag the artwork between the guitars.

You may need to drag the guitars to position the artwork like you see in the following figure.

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8. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

9. Choose Window > Workspace > Reset Essentials.

10. In the Layers panel (Window > Layers) collapse all layers and click the main layer named “Content” to select it.

Working with the perspective grid

In Illustrator, using the Perspective Grid tool (Image) and the Perspective Selection tool (Image), you can easily draw or render artwork in perspective. You can define the perspective grid in one-point, two-point, or three-point perspective; define a scale move the grid planes; and draw objects directly in perspective. You can even attach flat art onto the grid planes by dragging with the Perspective Selection tool.

In this section, you will create perspective artwork for the T-shirt.

1. Choose 1 Perspective from the Artboard menu in the lower-left corner of the Document window.

2. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window. Choose View > Zoom Out once.

3. Select the Perspective Grid tool (Image) in the Tools panel.

The default two-point perspective grid (which is nonprinting) appears on the artboard and can be used to draw and snap content in perspective. The two-point grid (for short) is composed of several planes or surfaces, by default—left (blue), right (orange), and a ground plane (green).

The following figure shows the default perspective grid by itself, with all of its options showing (you won’t see the ruler, for instance, by default). It may be helpful to refer to this figure as you progress through the lesson.

Image

A. Plane Switching Widget
B. Vertical grid extent
C. Perspective Grid ruler (not showing, by default)
D. Left vanishing point
E. Horizon level
F. Horizon height
G. Left ground-level point
H. Extent of grid
I. Grid cell size
J. Right grid-plane control
K. Horizontal grid-plane control
L. Left grid-plane control
M. Origin
N. Extent of grid
O. Right ground-level point
P. Right vanishing point

Using a preset grid

To begin this part of the lesson, you’ll work with the perspective grid, starting with an Illustrator preset. The perspective grid, by default, is set up as a two-point perspective. You can easily change the grid to a one-point, two-point, or three-point grid using presets, which is what you’ll do next.

1. Choose View > Perspective Grid > Three Point Perspective > [3P-Normal View]. Notice that the grid changes to a three-point perspective.

In addition to showing vanishing points for each wall, there is now a point showing those walls receding into the ground or high in space.

Image


Image Note

A one-point perspective can be very useful for roads, railway tracks, or buildings viewed so that the front is directly facing the viewer. Two-point perspective is useful for drawing a cube, such as a building, or for two roads going off into the distance, and it typically has two vanishing points. Three-point perspective is usually used for buildings seen from above or below.


2. Choose View > Perspective Grid > Two Point Perspective > [2P-Normal View]. Notice that the grid changes back to the default two-point perspective.

Adjusting the perspective grid

To create artwork in the perspective you want, you can adjust the grid using the Perspective Grid tool (Image) or using the View > Perspective Grid > Define Grid command. If you have content on the grid, you can make changes to it, although it will be easier to establish what your grid looks like before you add content.

In this section, you’ll make a few adjustments to the grid.

1. Make sure that the Smart Guides are on (View > Smart Guides).

2. With the Perspective Grid tool (Image) selected, position the pointer over the left ground-level point (circled in the figure). When the pointer changes (Image), drag it up to move the whole perspective grid. Match the position in the figure as closely as you can, but it does not have to match exactly.

Image


Image Note

You may need to zoom out to see the ground-level point.


The left and right ground-level points allow you to drag the perspective grid to a different position on the artboard or to a different artboard altogether. In this example, you didn’t really need to move the grid since you are creating perspective artwork that will become a part of the existing artwork on the 2 T-Shirt artboard, but it’s important to understand how to achieve this.

3. Press Command+– (Mac OS) or Ctrl+– (Windows), to zoom out.

4. Position the pointer over the right end of the horizon line, and the pointer shows a vertical arrow (Image). Click and drag down a bit until you see approximately 230 pt in the gray measurement label next to the pointer.

Image

The closer you are zoomed into the grid, the finer the increments that you can adjust it with.

Next, you will adjust the planes so that you can draw a cube that shows one side more than the other. This requires that you move a vanishing point.

5. Choose View > Perspective Grid > Lock Station Point.

This locks the left and right vanishing points so that they move together.

6. With the Perspective Grid tool, position the pointer over the right vanishing point (circled in the figure). When the pointer includes a horizontal arrow (Image), drag to the right until the measurement label shows an X value of approximately 11 in.

Image


Image Tip

If you had artwork on the grid, it would move with the grid.


This changes both planes on the grid, and the perspective artwork you create will have a more visible right face.

Setting the grid up for your drawing is an important step in creating the artwork with the perspective you desire. Next, you will access some of the perspective grid options you have already adjusted, and more, using the Define Perspective Grid dialog box.

7. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

8. Choose View > Perspective Grid > Define Grid.

9. In the Define Perspective Grid dialog box, change the following options:

• Units: Inches

• Gridline Every: 0.3 in

Image


Image Tip

After setting the Define Perspective Grid settings, you can save them as a preset to access later. In the Define Perspective Grid dialog box, change the settings, and then click the Save Preset button (Image).


Changing the Gridline Every option adjusts the grid cell size and can help you be more precise when drawing and editing on the grid, since content snaps to the lines of the grid by default. Notice that you can also change the Scale of the grid, which you might want to do if real-world measurements are involved. You can also edit settings, like Horizon Height and Viewing Angle, on the artboard, using the Perspective Grid tool. Leave the Grid Color & Opacity settings at their defaults.


Image Note

If the rest of the values in the Define Perspective Grid dialog box don’t match the figure, that’s okay. Don’t attempt to match the values since it can change your grid in unexpected ways.


When you have finished making changes, click OK. The grid will change in appearance slightly. The grid should now look pretty close to this (but doesn’t have to match exactly):

Image


Image Note

To learn more about the options in the Define Perspective Grid dialog box, search for “Perspective drawing” in Illustrator Help (Help > Illustrator Help).



Image Note

When you select a tool other than the Perspective Grid tool (Image), you cannot edit the perspective grid. Also, if the perspective grid is locked, you cannot edit most of the grid settings with the Perspective Grid tool. You can edit a locked grid by choosing View > Perspective Grid > Define Grid.


10. Choose View > Perspective Grid > Lock Grid.

This command restricts the grid movement and other grid-editing features of the Perspective Grid tool. You can only change the visibility and the grid plane position, which you will work with later in this lesson.

11. Choose File > Save.

Drawing artwork in perspective

To draw objects in perspective, you can use the line tools or the shape tools (except for the Flare tool) while the grid is visible. Before you begin drawing using any of these tools, you need to select a grid plane to attach the content to, using the Plane Switching Widget or keyboard shortcuts.

When the perspective grid is showing, a Plane Switching Widget appears in the upper-left corner of the Document window by default. The grid plane that is selected in the Plane Switching Widget is the active grid plane of the perspective grid to which you’ll add content. In the widget, you can select the planes, as well as see their keyboard shortcut when you hover over each part of the widget.

Image

1. Select the Rectangle tool (Image) in the Tools panel.

2. Select Left Grid(1), in the Plane Switching Widget (if it’s not already selected).

Image

3. Position the pointer at the origin of the perspective grid (where you see the red X in the figure). Notice that the cursor has an arrow pointing to the left (Image), indicating that you are about to draw on the left grid plane. Drag up and to the left, until the gray measurement label shows an approximate width of 1.2 in and a height of approximately 3.3 in. As you drag, the shape should be snapping to the gridlines.

Image


Image Tip

When drawing in perspective, you will find that you can still use the usual keyboard shortcuts for drawing objects, such as Shift-drag to constrain.



Image Tip

You can turn off grid snapping by choosing View > Perspective Grid > Snap To Grid. Snapping is enabled by default.


Zooming in brings more gridlines into view that are closer to the vanishing point. That’s why, depending on the zoom level, your grid may not match the figures exactly, and that’s okay.

4. With the rectangle selected, change the Fill color to the dark gray swatch with the named “C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=70” in the Control panel. Press the Escape key to hide the Swatches panel.

Image

5. Change the Stroke color to None (Image), if necessary, in the Control panel.

There are many ways to add content to the perspective grid. Next, you’ll create another rectangle a different way.

6. With the Rectangle tool still selected, click Right Grid(3) in the Plane Switching Widget to draw in perspective on the right grid plane.

Image

7. Position the pointer over the upper-right corner of the rectangle you just drew. When the word “anchor” appears, click. In the Rectangle dialog box, the width and height of the last rectangle you drew are showing. Click OK.

Notice that the pointer now has an arrow pointing to the right (Image), indicating that content you create will appear on the right grid plane.

Image

8. With the rectangle selected, change the Fill color in the Control panel to the light gray swatch with the named “C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=5.” Press the Escape key to hide the Swatches panel.

9. Change the Stroke color to None (Image), if necessary, in the Control panel.

In this example, you don’t need to create a top or bottom to the cube since the top is above the horizon line. If you needed to draw a top to the cube you are creating, you would select the perspective Horizontal Grid(2) in the Plane Switching Widget to draw in perspective on the ground (horizontal) plane.

10. Choose View > Perspective Grid > Hide Grid to hide the perspective grid and to see your artwork.

Image


Image Tip

You can also show and hide the perspective grid by pressing Shift+Command+I (Mac OS) or Shift+Ctrl+I (Windows) to toggle back and forth.


11. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Selecting and transforming objects in perspective

You can select objects in perspective using selection tools, such as the Selection tool (Image) and the Perspective Selection tool (Image). The Perspective Selection tool uses the active plane settings to select the objects. If you use the Selection tool to drag an object that was drawn in perspective, it maintains its original perspective, but it doesn’t change to match the perspective grid.

Next, you will resize the last rectangle you drew.

1. Position the pointer over the Perspective Grid tool (Image), click and hold down the mouse button, and then select the Perspective Selection tool (Image). Notice that the perspective grid appears again.


Image Note

If the grid doesn’t appear, you can choose View > Perspective Grid > Show Grid.


2. Click the rectangle with the light gray fill on the right grid plane to select it.

3. With the Perspective Selection tool selected, drag the middle-right point of the rectangle to the right. When the measurement label shows a width of about 3 in, release the mouse button. Make sure that the rectangle is snapping to the gridlines.

Image


Image Tip

Zooming into the grid may make it easier when resizing content.


Dragging a shape or resizing it will do so in perspective with the Perspective Selection tool.

4. With the Perspective Selection tool, click to select the first rectangle you created (on the left plane). Click the word “Transform” in the Control panel, and then click the right-middle point of the reference point locator (Image) in the Control panel. With the Constrain Width And Height Proportions option deselected (Image), change Width to 1.5 in, if necessary.

Image


Image Note

Depending on the resolution of your screen, you may see the Transform options in the Control panel.



Image Tip

Selecting artwork with the Perspective Selection tool selects the grid plane that it is on (in the Plane Switching Widget).


Aside from scaling artwork and performing other transformations, you can also drag artwork in perspective with the Perspective Selection tool. For example, dragging artwork on the horizontal grid up or down with the Perspective Selection tool makes it smaller and larger. Dragging it up moves the artwork “farther away” in perspective, and dragging it down moves it “closer” in perspective.

5. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Moving planes and objects together

As you saw in the beginning of this section, it’s usually best to adjust the grid before there is artwork on it. But Illustrator allows you to move objects by moving the grid planes. This can be good for precise perpendicular movement.

Next, you will move a grid plane and artwork together.

1. Select the Zoom tool (Image), and click the bottom of the perspective grid twice, slowly, to zoom into the grid.

2. Select the Perspective Selection tool (Image). Position the pointer over the left grid plane control (circled in the following figure), and double-click. In the Left Vanishing Plane dialog box, change Location to -0.15 in, select Move All Objects, and click OK.

Image


Image Tip

If you move a plane using the grid plane control, you can also choose Edit > Undo Perspective Grid Edit to put the plane back to its original location.


In the Left Vanishing Plane dialog box, the Do Not Move option allows you to move the grid plane and not the objects on it. The Copy All Objects option allows you to move the grid plane and to bring a copy of the objects on the grid plane with it. The Location option in the Left Vanishing Plane dialog box starts at the station point, which is 0. The station point is indicated by the very small green diamond on the perspective grid, above the horizontal grid control. You can also drag grid plane controls with the Perspective Selection tool to adjust them. By default, dragging a grid plane control moves the grid plane but not the artwork.


Image Tip

You can hold down Option (Mac OS) or Alt (Windows) and drag a grid plane control to move the grid plane and copy the content. Dragging a grid plane control while pressing the Shift key moves the objects with the grid plane without copying them.


3. With the Perspective Selection tool selected, drag the right-middle point of the dark gray rectangle to the left to make it narrower. Stop dragging when the point snaps to a gridline and the gray measurement label shows a width of approximately 1.39 in.

Image


Image Tip

If you select an object or objects on the grid plane first and then drag the grid plane control while holding down the Shift key, only the selected objects move with the grid plane.


Drawing artwork with no active grid

There will be times when you need to draw or add content that is not meant to be in perspective. In a case like that, you can select No Active Grid in the Plane Switching Widget to draw without regard to the grid. Next, you’ll draw a rectangle that will become a flat corner on the cube.

1. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

2. Select the Rectangle tool (Image) in the Tools panel.

3. Select No Active Grid(4), in the Plane Switching Widget.

Image

4. Position the pointer on the upper-right corner point of the dark gray rectangle on the left plane. When the word “anchor” appears, click and drag down and to the right. Snap to the lower-left corner of the light gray rectangle on the right plane. Release the mouse button when the word “anchor” appears.

Image

5. With the rectangle selected, change the Fill color in the Control panel to the light gray swatch with the named “C=0 M=0 Y=0 K=20.” Press the Escape key to hide the Swatches panel.

6. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Adding and editing text in perspective

You cannot add text directly to a perspective plane; however, you can bring text into perspective after creating it off of the perspective grid. Next, you will add some text and then edit it in perspective.

1. Select the Type tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Click in a blank area on the artboard, and type AMP.

2. Select the text with the Type tool, change Font to Myriad Pro (or another font if you don’t have that one), ensure that Font Style is Regular, and change Font Size to 16 pt in the Control panel.


Image Note

If you don’t see the Font Formatting options in the Control panel, click the word “Character” in the Control panel to reveal the Character panel.


3. Select the Perspective Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Press the number 3 key on the keyboard to select the Right Grid(3) plane in the Plane Switching Widget. Drag the text into the upper-right corner of the larger box.

Image

4. Select the Zoom tool and zoom in.

5. With the Perspective Selection tool selected, double-click the text object to enter Isolation mode. The Type tool is selected automatically.


Image Tip

You can also enter Isolation mode to edit text by clicking the Edit Text button (Image) in the Control panel. To exit Isolation mode, you can also click twice on the gray arrow that appears below the document tab at the top of the Document window.


6. Insert the cursor before the word “AMP,” and type Guitar with a spacebar space after it. You may need to zoom in so you can more easily see it (I did).

7. Select the Perspective Selection tool (Image), and double-click the artboard to exit Isolation mode.

8. Drag the “Guitar AMP” text so it fits in the corner of the light gray box, if necessary.

Image

Moving objects in a perpendicular direction

Now you’re going to add several circles to the grid and copy one in a direction perpendicular to the current location. This technique is useful when creating parallel objects, such as the legs of a chair.

1. Click and hold down on the Rectangle tool in the Tools panel. Select the Ellipse tool.

You may want to zoom out a bit for the next steps.

2. Making sure that the right plane is selected in the Plane Switching Widget, Shift-drag to create a small circle that has a width and height of roughly 2 in. Release the mouse button and then the key.

Image


Image Tip

To move objects from one plane to another, begin dragging artwork on the grid with the Perspective Selection tool, without releasing the mouse button yet. Press the number 1, 2, or 3 key (depending on which grid you intend to attach the objects to) to switch to the grid plane of your choice. These keyboard commands work only from the main keyboard and not from the extended numeric keypad.


3. Press the D key to apply the default fill and stroke to the circle.

4. With the circle selected, change the Fill color in the Control panel to None (Image), make sure that the Stroke color is black, and change the Stroke weight to 10 pt in the Control panel.

Image

5. Select the Perspective Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and drag the circle roughly into the center of the light gray rectangle.

6. With the circle still selected, choose Edit > Copy and then Edit > Paste In Front.

7. With the new circle selected, click the word “Transform” in the Control panel and, making sure that the Constrain Width And Height Proportions option (Image) is selected and the right-middle point of the Reference Point is selected (Image), change Width to 1.3 in.


Image Note

Depending on your screen resolution, the Transform options (like Width) may appear in your Control panel.


8. Ensure that the smaller circle is positioned roughly like you see in the figure at right.

9. With the Perspective Selection tool selected, hold down the number 5 key and drag the smaller circle, by its stroke, to the left a bit. When the circle looks something like the first part of the following figure, release the mouse, and then release the 5 key.

Image


Image Note

The keyboard shortcut 5, which is for perpendicular movement (and the keyboard shortcuts 1, 2, 3, and 4 for plane switching) while drawing or moving objects, works only from the main keyboard and not from the extended numeric keypad.



Image Tip

While pressing the number 5 key and dragging, you could press Option (Mac OS) or Alt (Windows) to copy the object that you are dragging.


10. Choose Object > Arrange > Bring To Front to bring the smaller circle to the front, if necessary.

Image

This action moves the object parallel to its current location and scales it in perspective.

11. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Moving a plane to match an object

When you want to draw or bring objects in perspective at the same depth or height as an existing object, such as the smaller circle, you can bring the corresponding grid to the desired height or depth. Next, you will move the right grid plane to the same depth as the smaller circle and add a logo to it.

1. With the Perspective Selection tool (Image) selected, click to select the small circle again.

2. Choose Object > Perspective > Move Plane To Match Object.

Image

Now anything you add to the right grid plane will be at the same depth as the smaller circle.

Bringing content into perspective

If you have already created content that is not in perspective, Illustrator provides an option to bring objects into perspective on an active plane in the perspective grid. You will now add a logo, which happens to be a symbol, to the perspective grid.


Image Note

Symbols that you wish to bring into perspective cannot contain such things as raster images, envelopes, or gradient meshes.


1. With the Perspective Selection tool (Image) selected, make sure that the Right Grid(3) is selected in the Plane Switching Widget.

Image

2. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

In the upper-left corner of the artboard, you’ll see artwork for a logo that is a symbol instance. Next, you’ll drag the symbol instance into perspective.

3. With the Perspective Selection tool, drag the logo symbol instance in the upper-left corner of the artboard into the center of the smaller circle to attach it to the right grid plane.

Image


Image Tip

Instead of dragging an object onto the plane using the Perspective Selection tool, you can also select the object with the Perspective Selection tool, choose the plane using the Plane Switching Widget, and then choose Object > Perspective > Attach To Active Plane. This adds the content to the active plane, but it doesn’t change its appearance.


Notice that the logo is behind the other artwork on the artboard. Content on the perspective grid has the same stacking order as content you draw off of the perspective grid.

4. Choose Object > Arrange > Bring To Front to bring the logo on top of the other artwork.

Image

5. Choose Select > Deselect.

6. In the Symbols panel (Window > Symbols), drag out the symbol named “Button.”

Image

You may want to zoom in a bit to the artwork for the next step.

7. With the Perspective Selection tool, make sure that the Right Grid(3) is selected in the Plane Switching Widget, and drag the button onto the light gray rectangle. See the first part of the following figure for placement.

8. Drag the symbol instance to the right. As you drag, press Option+Shift (Mac OS) or Alt+Shift (Windows) and continue dragging to create a copy. Release the mouse button and then the modifier keys.

Image

Editing symbols in perspective

After bringing symbols into perspective, you may need to edit them. Just know that functionalities, such as replacing a symbol or breaking a link to a symbol instance, do not work on symbols in perspective. Next, you’ll make a change to the logo.

1. Select the Zoom tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and zoom into the logo.

2. Select the Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and double-click the logo you just dragged into perspective. Click OK in the warning dialog that appears. Click to select the “V” artwork.

Image


Image Note

You could also double-click the symbol with the Perspective Selection tool to edit it.


This enters Symbol Editing mode and hides the rest of the artwork on the artboard.

3. Change the Fill color in the Control panel to the red swatch with the name “CMYK Red.” Press the Escape key to hide the Swatches panel.

4. Double-click away from the symbol content to exit Symbol Editing mode so that you can edit the rest of the content.

Image

5. Choose Select > Deselect, if necessary.

Finishing Up

There are a few small things yet to do on the perspective artwork, and in this section, you’ll finish up.

1. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

2. Select the Perspective Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Click to select the light gray rectangle on the right grid plane. Choose Object > Perspective > Move Plane To Match Object.

Image

The right grid plane is now back to where it was earlier in the lesson.

3. With the light gray rectangle still selected, choose Edit > Copy and then choose Edit > Paste In Front.

4. With the copy selected, change the Fill color in the Control panel to Black. Press the Escape key to hide the Swatches panel.

5. Press the Shift key and drag the top-middle point down to make the rectangle a bit smaller. Use the first part of the following figure as a guide.


Image Tip

Pressing the Shift key with the pointer over the grid will hide all planes in the perspective grid except for the active one.


6. Choose Object > Arrange > Bring To Front.

7. Change Opacity to 95% in the Control panel.

Image

8. Choose Select > All On Active Artboard. Choose Edit > Copy.

9. Choose 2 T-Shirt from the Artboard menu in the lower-left corner of the Document window.

10. Choose Edit > Paste.

11. Choose Object > Perspective > Release With Perspective.

12. Choose Object > Group.

13. Choose Object > Arrange > Send To Back.

14. Select the Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and Shift-drag a corner of the selected artwork to make it smaller. When you the gray measurement label shows an approximate width of 1.6, release the mouse button and then the Shift key.

Image

15. Arrange all the artwork like you see in the following figure. I wound up moving some of the musical notes symbol instances as well to make it look a bit better.

16. Choose Select > Deselect.

Image

17. Choose File > Save, and then choose File > Close.

Review questions

1. What are three benefits of using symbols?

2. How do you update an existing symbol?

3. What is a dynamic symbol?

4. In Illustrator, what type of content can you save in a Library?

5. Explain how to embed a linked library graphic asset.

6. Before drawing content on a grid plane, what must be done to ensure that the object is on the correct grid plane?

Review answers

1. Three benefits of using symbols are as follows:

• You can edit one symbol, and all instances are updated.

• You can map artwork to 3D objects (not discussed in the lesson).

• Using symbols reduces file size.

2. To update an existing symbol, double-click the symbol icon in the Symbols panel, double-click an instance of the symbol on the artboard, or select the instance on the artboard and then click the Edit Symbol button in the Control panel. Then you can make edits in Isolation mode.

3. When a symbol is saved as Dynamic, you can change certain appearance properties of instances using the Direct Selection tool (Image) without editing the original symbol.

4. In Illustrator, you can save colors (fill and stroke), graphic assets, and type formatting.

5. By default in Illustrator, when a graphic asset is dragged from the Libraries panel into a document, a link is created to the original Library asset. In order to embed a graphic asset, select the asset in the document, and click Embed in the Control panel. Once embedded, the graphic will no longer update if the original library asset is edited.

6. The correct grid plane must be selected by choosing it in the Plane Switching Widget. You can select it by using the following keyboard commands: Left Grid(1), Horizontal Grid(2), Right Grid(3), or No Active Grid(4); or by selecting content on the grid you want to choose with the Perspective Selection tool (Image).