Using Illustrator CC with Other Adobe Applications - Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book 2015 release (2016) 

Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book 2015 release (2016)

14. Using Illustrator CC with Other Adobe Applications

Lesson overview

In this lesson, you’ll learn how to do the following:

• Place linked and embedded graphics in an Illustrator file.

• Place multiple images at once.

• Apply color edits to images.

• Create and edit clipping masks.

• Use text to mask an image.

• Make and edit an opacity mask.

• Sample color in a placed image.

• Work with the Links panel.

• Embed and unembed images.

• Replace a placed image with another and update the document.

• Package a document.

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This lesson takes approximately 60 minutes to complete.

Download the project files for this lesson from the Lesson & Update Files tab on your Account page at www.peachpit.com and store them on your computer in a convenient location, as described in the “Getting Started” section of this book.

Your Account page is also where you’ll find any updates to the chapters or to the lesson files. Look on the Lesson & Update Files tab to access the most current content.

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You can easily add an image created in an image-editing program to an Adobe Illustrator file. This is an effective method for incorporating images into your vector artwork or for trying Illustrator special effects on bitmap images.

Getting started

Before you begin, you’ll need to restore the default preferences for Adobe Illustrator CC. Then you’ll open the finished art file for this lesson to see what you’ll create.

1. To ensure that the tools and panels function exactly as described in this lesson, delete or deactivate (by renaming) the Adobe Illustrator CC preferences file. See “Restoring default preferences” in the “Getting Started” section at the beginning of the book.


Image Note

If you have not already downloaded the project files for this lesson to your computer from your Account page, make sure to do so now. See the “Getting Started” section at the beginning of this book.


2. Start Adobe Illustrator CC.

3. Choose File > Open. Locate the file named L14_end.ai in the Lessons > Lesson14 folder that you copied onto your hard disk.

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This is a small poster for a vacation destination, and you will add and edit graphics in this lesson.

4. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window and leave it open for reference, or choose File > Close.


Image Note

The fonts in the L14_end.ai file have been converted to outlines (Type > Create Outlines) to avoid having missing fonts.


5. Choose File > Open. If a panel appears, click Open in the panel. You could also choose File > Open again. In the Open dialog box, navigate to the Lessons > Lesson14 folder and select the L14_start.ai file on your hard disk. Click Open to open the file. This is a small poster for a travel company, and you will add and edit graphics in this lesson.

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6. The Missing Fonts dialog box may appear. Click Sync Fonts to sync all the missing fonts to your computer. After they are synced and you see the message stating that there are no more missing fonts, click Close.

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Image Note

You need an Internet connection to sync the fonts. The syncing process may take a few minutes.


If you can’t get the fonts to sync (a “Syncing Typekit fonts...” message doesn’t go away), you can go to the Creative Cloud desktop application and choose Assets > Fonts to see what the issue may be (refer to the section “Changing font family and font style” in Lesson 8, “Adding Type to a Poster,” for more information on how to resolve it). You can also just click Close in the Missing Fonts dialog box and ignore the missing fonts as you proceed. A third method is to click the Find Fonts button in the Missing Fonts dialog box and replace the fonts with a local font on your machine.

7. Choose File > Save As. In the Save As dialog box, navigate to the Lesson14 folder, and open it. Name the file GreenIsle.ai. Leave the Format option set to Adobe Illustrator (ai) (Mac OS) or the Save As Type option set to Adobe Illustrator (*.AI) (Windows), and then click Save. In the Illustrator Options dialog box, leave the Illustrator options at their default settings. Click OK.


Image Note

You can also go to Help (Help > Illustrator Help) and search for “Find missing fonts.


8. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

9. Choose Window > Workspace > Reset Essentials to reset the Essentials workspace.


Working with Adobe Bridge

Adobe Bridge CC is an application available with your Adobe Creative Cloud subscription. Bridge provides you with centralized access to all the media assets you need for your creative projects.

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Bridge simplifies your workflow and keeps you organized. You can batch edit with ease, add watermarks, and even set centralized color preferences. You can access Adobe Bridge from within Illustrator by choosing File > Browse In Bridge.


Combining artwork

You can combine Illustrator artwork with images from other graphics applications in a variety of ways for a wide range of creative results. Sharing artwork among applications lets you combine continuous-tone paintings and photographs with vector art. Illustrator lets you create certain types of raster images, and Adobe Photoshop excels at many additional image-editing tasks. The images edited or created in Photoshop can then be inserted into Illustrator.


Image Note

To learn more about working with vector and raster images, see the “Introducing Adobe Illustrator” section in Lesson 1, “Getting to Know the Work Area.”


This lesson steps you through the process of creating a composite image, including combining bitmap images with vector art and working between applications. You will add photographic images created in Photoshop to a small poster created in Illustrator. Then you’ll adjust the color of an image, mask an image, and sample color from an image to use in the Illustrator artwork. You’ll update a placed image and then package the file.

Placing image files

You can bring raster artwork from Photoshop or other applications into Illustrator using the Open command, the Place command, the Paste command, drag-and-drop operations, and the Library panel. Illustrator supports most Adobe Photoshop data, including layer comps, layers, editable text, and paths. This means that you can transfer files between Photoshop and Illustrator without losing the ability to edit the artwork.

When placing files using the File > Place command, no matter what type of image file it is (JPG, GIF, PSD, etc.), it can be either embedded or linked. Embedding files stores a copy of the image in the Illustrator file, and the Illustrator file size increases to reflect the addition of the placed file.Linked files remain separate external files, and a link to the external file is placed in the Illustrator file. A linked file does not add significantly to the size of the Illustrator file. Linking to files can be a great way to ensure that image updates are reflected in the Illustrator file. The linked file must always accompany the Illustrator file, or the link will break and the placed file will not appear in the Illustrator artwork.


Image Note

Illustrator includes support for DeviceN rasters. For instance, if you create a Duotone image in Photoshop and place it in Illustrator, it separates properly and prints the spot colors.


Placing an image

First, you will place a JPEG (.jpg) image into your document.

1. Click the Layers panel icon (Image) to open the Layers panel. In the Layers panel, select the layer named “Pictures.”

When you place an image, it is added to the selected layer. The layer already includes several shapes you see off the left edge of the artboard.

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2. Choose File > Place.

3. Navigate to the Lessons > Lesson14 > images folder, and select the Kayak.jpg file. Make sure that Link is selected in the Place dialog box. Click Place.

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The pointer should now show the loaded graphics cursor. You can see “1/1” next to the pointer, indicating how many images are being placed (1 of 1), and a thumbnail so you can see what image you are placing.

4. Position the loaded graphics cursor near the upper-left corner of the artboard, and click to place the image. Leave the image selected.

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Image Tip

The X on a selected image indicates that the image is linked (with edges showing, View > Show Edges).


The image appears on the artboard, with the upper-left corner of the image placed where you clicked. The image is 100% of its original size. You could also have dragged with the loaded graphics cursor to size the image as you placed it. Notice in the Control panel that, with the image selected, you see the words “Linked File,” indicating that the image is linked to its source file, together with other information about the image. By default, placed image files are linked to their source file. So, if the source file is edited (outside of Illustrator), the placed image in Illustrator is updated. Deselecting the Link option while placing embeds the image file in the Illustrator file.

Scaling a placed image

You can duplicate and transform placed images just as you do other objects in an Illustrator file. Unlike vector artwork, you need to consider the resolution of the raster image content in your document since raster images without enough resolution may look pixelated when printed. Working in Illustrator, if you make an image smaller, the resolution of the image increases. If you make an image larger, the resolution decreases. Next, you will move, resize, and rotate the Kayak.jpg image.

1. Holding down the Shift key, use the Selection tool (Image) to drag the lower-right bounding point toward the center of the image until the measurement label shows a width of approximately 5 in. Release the mouse button, and then release the key.

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Image Note

Transformations performed on a linked image in Illustrator, and any resulting resolution changes, do not change the original image. The changes apply only to the image within Illustrator.



Image Tip

To transform a placed image, you can also open the Transform panel (Window > Transform) and change settings there.


After resizing the image, notice that the PPI (Pixels Per Inch) value in the Control panel is approximately 150. PPI refers to the resolution of the image. Other transformations like rotation can also be applied to images using the various methods you learned in Lesson 5, “Transforming Artwork.”


Image Tip

Much like other artwork, you can also Option+Shift-drag (Mac OS) or Alt+Shift-drag (Windows) a bounding point around an image to resize from the center, while maintaining the image proportions.


2. Click the Linked File text link on the left end of the Control panel to see the Links panel. With the Kayak.jpg file selected in the Links panel, click the Show Link Info arrow in the lower-left corner of the panel to see information about the image.

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You can see the scale percentage as well as rotation information, size, and much more.

3. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Placing a Photoshop image with Show Import Options

When you place image files in Illustrator, you have the ability to change image options when the file is imported (when available). For instance, if you place a Photoshop file (.psd), you can choose to flatten the image or even to preserve the original Photoshop layers in the file. Next, you’ll place a Photoshop file, set import options, and embed it in the Illustrator file.

1. In the Layers panel, click the eye icon (Image) for the Pictures layer to hide the contents, and then select the Background layer.

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2. Choose File > Place.

3. In the Place dialog box, navigate to the Lessons > Lesson14 > images folder, and select the Lilypads.psd file. In the Place dialog box, set the following options:

• Link: Deselected (Deselecting the Link option embeds an image file in the Illustrator file. Embedding the Photoshop file allows for more options when it is placed, as you’ll see.)

• Show Import Options: Selected (Selecting this option will open an import options dialog box where you can set import options before placing.)


Image Note

You may not see a preview for the Photoshop file, even though the figure shows one, and that’s okay.


4. Click Place.

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The Photoshop Import Options dialog box appears because you selected Show Import Options in the Place dialog box.


Image Note

Even though you select Show Import Options in the Place dialog box, the Import Options dialog box will not appear if the image doesn’t have multiple layers.


5. In the Photoshop Import Options dialog box, set the following options:

• Layer Comp: All (A layer comp is a snapshot of a state of the Layers panel that you create in Photoshop. In Photoshop, you can create, manage, and view multiple versions of a layout in a single Photoshop file. Any comments associated with the layer comp in Photoshop will appear in the Comments area.)

• Show Preview: Selected (Preview displays a preview of the selected layer comp.)

• Convert Layers To Objects: Selected (This option and the next one are available only because you deselected the Link option and chose to embed the Photoshop image.)

• Import Hidden Layers: Selected (to import layers hidden in Photoshop)

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Image Tip

To learn more about layer comps, see “Importing artwork from Photoshop” in Illustrator Help (Help > Illustrator Help).


6. Click OK.


Image Note

A color mode warning may appear in the Photoshop Import Options dialog box. This indicates that the image you are placing may not be the same color mode as the Illustrator document. For this image (and going forward), if a color warning dialog box appears, click OK to dismiss it.


7. Position the loaded graphics cursor in the upper-left corner of the artboard, and click to place the image.

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Image Note

The word “intersect” may be hidden by the top edge of the Document window.


Rather than flatten the file, you have converted the Lilypads.psd Photoshop layers to layers that you can show and hide in Illustrator. When placing a Photoshop file in particular, if you had left the Link option selected (to link to the original PSD file), the only option in the Options section of the Photoshop Import Options dialog box would have been to flatten the content.

8. In the Layers panel, click the Locate Object button (Image) to reveal the image content in the Layers panel. You may want to drag the left edge of the Layers panel to see more of the layer names.

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Notice the sublayers of Lilypads.psd. These sublayers were Photoshop layers in Photoshop and appear in the Layers panel in Illustrator because you chose not to flatten the image when you placed it. Also notice that, with the image still selected on the page, the Control panel shows the word “Group” on the left side and includes an underlined link to “Multiple Images.” When you place a Photoshop file with layers and you choose to convert the layers to objects in the Photoshop Import Options dialog box, Illustrator treats the layers as separate sublayers in a group. This particular image had a layer mask in Photoshop applied to Layer 0, which is why the image appears to fade.

9. Click the eye icon (Image) to the left of the Color Fill 1 sublayer to hide it.

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10. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Placing multiple images

In Illustrator you can also place multiple files in a single action. Next, you’ll place two images at once and then position them.

1. In the Layers panel, click the disclosure triangle (Image) to the left of the Background layer to collapse the layer contents. Click the visibility column of the layers named “Pictures” and “Text” to show the contents for each, and then ensure that the Background layer is selected.

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2. Choose File > Place.

3. In the Place dialog box, select the Water.jpg file in the Lessons > Lesson14 > images folder. Command-click (Mac OS) or Ctrl-click (Windows) the image named Text.psd to select both image files. Deselect the Show Import Options option and make sure that the Link option is notselected. Click Place.

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Image Tip

You could also select a range of files in the Place dialog box by pressing the Shift key.



Image Note

The Place dialog box you see in Illustrator may show the images in a different view, like a List view, and that’s okay.


4. Position the loaded graphics cursor on the left side of the artboard. Press the Right or Left Arrow key (or Up and Down Arrow keys) a few times to see that you can cycle between the image thumbnails. Make sure that you see the water image thumbnail, and click the left edge of the artboard, about halfway down, to place the image.

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Image Note

The figure shows after clicking to place the Water.jpg image.



Image Tip

To discard an asset that is loaded and ready to be placed, use the arrow keys to navigate to the asset, and then press the Escape key.


Whichever thumbnail is showing in the loaded graphics cursor when you click in the Document window is placed.

5. Press and hold the spacebar and drag to the left so that you see the area off the right side of the artboard.

6. Position the loaded graphics cursor off the right side of the artboard. Click and drag down and to the right, stopping when the image is roughly as big as you see in the figure. Leave the image selected.

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You can either click to place an image at 100% or click and drag to place an image and size it as you place it in the Document window. By dragging when you place an image, you are resizing the image. Resizing an image in Illustrator will most likely result in a different resolution than the original. Once again, you can look at the PPI (Pixels Per Inch) value in the Control panel to see the resolution of the image. The original PPI of the Text.psd image was 150 PPI.

7. With the Text.psd image (the image of the green leaf) still selected, drag the selected art indicator (the colored box) in the Layers panel up to the Text layer to move the image to the Text layer.

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8. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

Applying color edits to an image

In Illustrator, you can convert images to a different color mode (such as RGB, CMYK, or grayscale) or adjust individual color values. You can also saturate (darken) or desaturate (lighten) colors or invert colors (create a color negative).

In order to edit colors in the image, the image needs to be embedded in the Illustrator file. If the file is linked, you can edit the color of the image in a program like Photoshop and then update it in Illustrator.

1. In the Layers panel, click the eye icons (Image) in the visibility column for the Pictures and Text layers to hide their contents.

2. With the Selection tool (Image), click to select the Lilypads.psd image at the top of the artboard.

3. Choose Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Color Balance.

4. In the Adjust Colors dialog box, drag the sliders or enter values for the CMYK percentages to change the colors in the image. You can press Tab to move between the text fields. I used the following values:

• C= 5

• M= –25

• Y= 10

• K= 0

Feel free to experiment a little. Select Preview so that you can see the color changes. Click OK.

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Image Note

To see the results, you may need to select and deselect Preview as you change options in the Adjust Colors dialog box.



Image Note

If you later decide to adjust the colors of the same image by choosing Edit > Edit Colors > Adjust Color Balance, the color values will be set to 0 (zero).


5. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

6. In the Layers panel, click the visibility column for the Pictures and Text layers to show their contents. Click the eye icon (Image) in the visibility column for the Background layer to hide its contents.

Masking images

To achieve certain design effects, you can apply a clipping mask (clipping path), or an object whose shape masks other artwork so that only areas that lie within the shape are visible. In the first part of the figure at right is an image with a white circle on top. In the second part of the figure, the white circle was used to mask the image.

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Image Note

You will hear people use the phrases “clipping mask,” “clipping path,” and “mask.” The way most of us refer to them, they mean the same thing.


Only vector objects can be clipping paths; however, any artwork can be masked. You can also import masks created in Photoshop files. The clipping path and the masked object are referred to as the clipping set.

Applying a simple mask to an image

In this short section, you’ll see how to let Illustrator create a simple mask for you on the Kayak.jpg image so that you can hide part of the image.

1. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, click the Kayak.jpg image to select it (the first image you placed). Click the Mask button in the Control panel.

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Image Tip

You can also apply a clipping mask by choosing Object > Clipping Mask > Make.


Clicking the Mask button applies a clipping mask to the image in the shape and size of the image. In this case, the image itself does not look any different.

2. In the Layers panel, click the Locate Object button (Image) at the bottom of the panel.

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Image Note

You may need to drag the left edge of the Layers panel to the left to see more of the names, like I did for the figure.


Notice the <Clipping Path> and <Linked File> sublayers that are contained within the <Clip Group> sublayer. The <Clipping Path> object is the clipping path (mask) that was created, and the <Clip Group> is a set that contains the mask and the object that is masked (the linked image).

Editing a clipping path (mask)

In order to edit a clipping path, you need to be able to select it. Illustrator offers several ways to do this. Next, you will edit the mask you just created.

1. With the kayak image still selected on the artboard, click the Edit Contents button (Image) in the Control panel and, in the Layers panel, notice that the <Linked File> sublayer (in the <Clip Group>) is showing the selected-art indicator (small color box) to the far right of the sublayer name.

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Image Tip

You can also double-click a clip group (object masked with a clipping path) to enter Isolation mode. You can then either click the masked object (the image in this case) to select it or click the edge of the clipping path to select the clipping path. After you are finished editing, you can then exit Isolation mode using a variety of methods as discussed in previous lessons (like pressing the Escape key).


2. Click the Edit Clipping Path button (Image) in the Control panel, and notice that the <Clipping Path> is now selected (it’s showing the selected-art indicator in the Layers panel).

When an object is masked, you can edit the mask, the object that is masked, or both. Use these two buttons to select which to edit. When you first click to select an object that is masked, you will edit both the mask and the masked object.

3. With the Edit Clipping Path button (Image) selected in the Control panel, choose View > Outline.

4. Use the Selection tool (Image) to drag the top-middle bounding point of the selected mask down until the measurement label shows a height of approximately 3.25 in.

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Image Tip

You can also edit a clipping path with transformation options, like rotate, skew, etc., or by using the Direct Selection tool (Image).


5. Choose View > GPU Preview (or Preview On CPU if that is all that is available).

6. Click Transform (or X, Y, W, or H) in the Control panel (or open the Transform panel [Window > Transform]), and ensure that the center of the Reference Point is selected (Image). Make sure that the Constrain Width And Height Proportions is off (Image), and change Width to 3.5 in. If you see that Height is not 3.25 in, go ahead and make it so.

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7. In the Control panel, click the Edit Contents button (Image) to edit the Kayak.jpg image, not the mask.


Image Tip

You can also press the arrow keys on the keyboard to reposition the image.


8. With the Selection tool (Image), be careful to drag from within the bounds of the mask, down a little bit, and release the mouse button. Notice that you are moving the image and not the mask.

With the Edit Contents button (Image) selected, you can apply many transformations to the image, including scaling, moving, rotating, and more.

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9. Choose Select > Deselect, and then click the image again to select the entire clip group. Drag the image onto the light gray rectangle, and position it like you see in the figure.

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10. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Masking an object with text

In this section, you’ll use text as a mask for an image you placed. In order to create a mask from text, the text needs to be on top of the image, as you’ll see.

1. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, drag the green leaf image (Text.psd) from off the right side of the artboard on top of the “ISLE” text.

2. Choose Object > Arrange > Send To Back. You should see the “ISLE” text now. Make sure that the image is positioned roughly like you see in the figure.


Image Note

If the Text.psd image is not as wide as the “ISLE” text, make sure you resize the image, holding down the Shift key to constrain the proportions. Don’t worry if it’s larger than you see in the figure.



Image Tip

You can also choose Object > Clipping Mask > Make.


3. With the image still selected, Shift-click the “ISLE” text to select them both. Right-click over the selected content, and choose Make Clipping Mask from the context menu.

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You can edit the Text.psd image and the clipping mask separately, just as you did previously with the masked Kayak.jpg image.

4. With the text still selected, open the Graphic Styles panel (Window > Graphic Styles) and select the Text Shadow graphic style to apply a drop shadow.

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5. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.


Masking an object with multiple shapes

You can easily create a mask from either a single shape or multiple shapes. In order to create a clipping mask with multiple shapes, the shapes first need to be converted to a compound path. This can be done by selecting the shapes that will be used as the mask and choosing Object > Compound Path > Make. Ensure that the compound path is on top of the content to be masked, and then choose Object > Clipping Mask > Make.


Creating an opacity mask

An opacity mask is different from a clipping mask because it allows you to mask an object and alter the transparency of artwork. You can make and edit an opacity mask using the Transparency panel. In this section, you’ll create an opacity mask for the Water.jpg image so that it fades into the blue color of the background shape.

1. In the Layers panel, click the disclosure triangles for all layers (Image) to collapse the contents, if necessary. Click the visibility column to the left of the Background layer to see its contents. Click the eye icon (Image) to the left of the Pictures and Text layers to hide their contents.

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2. With the Selection tool selected, click the water image on the artboard. Choose Align To Artboard from the Align To menu, if necessary, in the Control panel. Click the Horizontal Align Center button (Image) and then the Vertical Align Center button (Image) in the Control panel to align the image to the artboard.

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3. Select the Rectangle tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and click in the approximate center of the artboard. In the Rectangle dialog box, change Width to 9 in and Height to 8 in. Click OK. This will become the mask.

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4. Press the D key to set the default stroke (black, 1pt) and fill (white) for the new rectangle.

5. Select the Selection tool (Image), and with the rectangle selected, click the Horizontal Align Center button (Image) and then the Vertical Align Bottom button (Image) in the Control panel to align the rectangle to the bottom center of the artboard.

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6. Press the Shift key, and click the Water.jpg image to select it as well.


Image Note

The object that is to become the opacity mask (the masking object) needs to be the top selected object on the artboard. If it is a single object, like a rectangle, it does not need to be a compound path. If the opacity mask is to be made from multiple objects, they need to be grouped.


7. Choose Window > Transparency to open the Transparency panel. Click the Make Mask button, and leave the artwork selected.


Image Note

If you wanted to create a mask that was the same dimensions as the image, instead of drawing a shape, you could have simply clicked the Make Mask button in the Transparency panel.


After clicking the Make Mask button, the button now shows as “Release.” If you were to click the button again, the image would no longer be masked.

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Editing an opacity mask

Next, you’ll adjust the opacity mask that you just created.

1. In the Transparency panel, Shift-click the mask thumbnail (as indicated by the white rectangle on the black background) to disable the mask.

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Image Tip

To disable and enable an opacity mask, you can also choose Disable Opacity Mask or Enable Opacity Mask from the Transparency panel menu.


Notice that a red X appears on the mask in the Transparency panel and that the entire Water.jpg image reappears in the Document window.

2. In the Transparency panel, Shift-click the mask thumbnail to enable the mask again.

3. Click to select the mask thumbnail on the right side of the Transparency panel. If the mask isn’t selected on the artboard, click to select it with the Selection tool (Image).

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Image Tip

To show the mask by itself (in grayscale if the original mask had color in it) on the artboard, you can also Option-click (Mac OS) or Alt-click (Windows) the mask thumbnail in the Transparency panel.


Clicking the opacity mask in the Transparency panel selects the mask (the rectangle path) on the artboard. With the mask selected, you can’t edit other artwork on the artboard. Also, notice that the document tab shows (<Opacity Mask>/Opacity Mask), indicating that you are now editing the mask.

4. Click the Layers panel icon (Image) on the right side of the workspace to reveal the Layers panel.

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In the Layers panel, notice that the layer <Opacity Mask> appears, indicating that the mask—rather than the artwork that is being masked—is selected.

5. With the mask selected in the Transparency panel and on the artboard, click the Fill color in the Control panel, and select a white-to-black linear gradient, called White, Black.

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You will now see that where there is white in the mask, the Water.jpg image is showing, and where there is black, it is hidden. The gradient mask gradually reveals the image.

6. Make sure that the Fill box (toward the bottom of the Tools panel or in the Swatches panel) is selected.

7. Select the Gradient tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Holding down the Shift key, position the pointer close to the bottom of the Water.jpg image. Click and drag up to just below the top of the mask shape, as shown in the figure. Release the mouse button, and then release the Shift key.

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8. Click the Transparency panel icon (Image), and notice how the mask has changed appearance in the Transparency panel.

Next, you’ll move the image but not the opacity mask. With the image thumbnail selected in the Transparency panel, both the image and the mask are linked together by default so that if you move the image, the mask moves as well.

9. In the Transparency panel, click the image thumbnail so that you are no longer editing the mask. Click the link icon (Image) between the image thumbnail and the mask thumbnail. This allows you to move just the image or the mask, but not both.

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Image Note

You have access to the link icon only when the image thumbnail, not the mask thumbnail, is selected in the Transparency panel.


10. With the Selection tool, begin dragging the Water.jpg image down. As you drag, press and hold the Shift key to constrain the movement vertically. After you drag a little, release the mouse button, and then release the Shift key to see where it is positioned.

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Image Note

The position of Water.jpg does not have to match the figure exactly.


11. In the Transparency panel, click the broken link icon (Image) between the image thumbnail and the mask thumbnail to link the two together again.

12. Choose Object > Arrange > Send To Back to send the Water.jpg image behind the Lilypads.psd image. It won’t look like anything has changed on the artboard, but later you will attempt to select the Lilypads.psd image, and it will need to be on top of the Water.jpg image.

13. Choose Select > Deselect, and then choose File > Save.

Sampling colors in placed images

You can sample, or copy, the colors in placed images to apply the colors to artwork. Sampling colors enables you to easily make colors consistent in a file that combines images and Illustrator artwork.

1. In the Layers panel, make sure that all of the layers are collapsed, and then click the visibility column to the left of the Text and Pictures layers to show the layer contents on the artboard.

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2. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, click the text “green.”

3. Make sure that the Fill box (toward the bottom of the Tools panel) is selected.

4. Select the Eyedropper tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and Shift-click a green area in one of the lily pads to sample and apply a green color to the text. You can try sampling the color of different images and content, if you want. The color you sample is applied to the selected text.

Image


Image Note

Using the Shift key with the Eyedropper tool allows you to apply only the sampled color to the selected object. If you don’t use the Shift key, you apply all appearance attributes to the selected object.


5. Choose Select > Deselect.

Working with image links

When you place images in Illustrator and either link to them or embed them, you can see a listing of these images in the Links panel. You use the Links panel to see and manage all linked or embedded artwork. The Links panel displays a small thumbnail of the artwork and uses icons to indicate the artwork’s status. From the Links panel, you can view the images that have been linked to and embedded, replace a placed image, update a linked image that has been edited outside of Illustrator, or edit a linked image in the original application, such as Photoshop.

Finding link information

When you place an image, it can be helpful to see where the original image is located, what transformations have been applied to the image (such as rotation and scale), and more information. Next, you will explore the Links panel to discover image information.

1. Choose Window > Workspace > Reset Essentials.

2. Choose Window > Links to open the Links panel.

Looking in the Links panel, you will see a listing of all the images you’ve placed. Images with a name to the right of the image thumbnail are linked, and those images without a name are embedded. You can also tell whether an image has been embedded by the embedded icon (Image).

3. Scroll in the panel, if necessary, and select the Kayak.jpg image (which shows the name to the right of the thumbnail). Click the toggle arrow in the lower-left corner of the Layers panel to reveal the link information at the bottom of the panel.


Image Tip

You can also double-click the image in the Layers panel list to see the image information.


You will see information, such as the name, original location of the image, file format, resolution, modification and creation dates, transformation information, and more.

Image

4. Click the Go To Link button (Image) below the list of images. The Kayak.jpg image will be selected and centered in the Document window. The words “Linked File” will appear in the Selection Indicator of the Control panel (on the left end).

Image

5. In the Control panel, click the link “Kayak.jpg” to reveal a menu of options.

The menu of options that appears mirrors those options found in the Links panel. If you were to select an embedded image, you would instead see the link named Embedded in the Control panel. Clicking that orange link (default color) would show the same menu options, but some of them would be inaccessible.

6. Press the Escape key to hide the menu and leave the Kayak.jpg image selected.

Embedding and unembedding images

As was mentioned previously, if you choose not to link to an image when placing it, the image is embedded in the Illustrator file. That means that the image data is stored within the Illustrator document. You can choose to embed an image later, after placing and linking to it, if you choose. Also, you might want to use embedded images outside of Illustrator or to edit them in an image-editing application like Photoshop. Illustrator allows you to unembed images, which saves the embedded artwork to your file system as a PSD or TIFF file (you can choose) and automatically links it to the Illustrator file. Next, you will embed an image in the document.

1. With the Kayak.jpg image still selected, click the Embed button in the Control panel to embed the image.

Image


Image Note

Neither 1-bit images nor images that are either locked or hidden can be unembedded.


The link to the original image file is removed, and the image data is embedded in the Illustrator document. Visually, you can tell the image is embedded because it no longer has the X going through the middle of it (with the image selected and edges showing [View > Show Edges]) and an embed icon (Image) appears in the Links panel to the far right of the name.


Image Note

Certain file formats, like PSD, show an Import Options dialog box when you embed the image, allowing you to select placement options.


With an image embedded, you may realize that you need to make an edit to that image in a program like Adobe Photoshop. You can just as easily unembed an image, which is what you’ll do next to the Kayak.jpg image.

2. With the Kayak.jpg image still selected on the artboard, click the Unembed button in the Control panel. You can also choose Unembed from the Links panel menu (Image).

3. In the Unembed dialog box, navigate to the Lessons > Lesson14 > images folder (if you are not already there). Choose TIFF (*.TIF) from the File Format menu (Mac OS) or from the Save As Type (Windows) menu, and click Save.

Image


Image Note

The embedded Kayak.jpg image data is unembedded from the file and saved as a TIFF file in the images folder. The kayak image on the artboard is now linked to the TIFF file.


Replacing a linked image

You can easily replace a linked or embedded image with another image to update the artwork. The replacement image is positioned exactly where the original image was, so no adjustment should be necessary if the new image is of the same dimensions. If you scaled the image that you are replacing, you may need to resize the replacement image to match the original. Next, you will replace several images.

1. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, drag the gradient-filled rectangle off the left edge of the artboard on top of the Kayak.tif image, centering it on the image using the Smart Guides.

Image

2. Choose Object > Arrange > Bring To Front to bring the gradient-filled rectangle on top of the image.

3. In the Layers panel, click the edit column to the left of the Background layer to lock the layer content on the artboard.

Image

4. Drag across the Kayak.tif image, the gradient-filled rectangle, and the light gray rectangle beneath it to select the artwork.

5. Choose Object > Group.

6. Drag the new group up so that its top aligns with the top of the artboard.

Image

7. Choose View > Smart Guides to turn them off.

8. Option-drag (Mac OS) or Alt-drag (Windows) the group down to create a copy. Use the figure as a guide for where to position the copy.

Image

9. Repeat this two more times so that you have four image groups on the artboard and they are positioned roughly like you see in the following figure.

In the Links panel, you will see a series of Kayak.tif images listed in the panel.

Next, you will replace the images and then rotate the pictures.

10. Click the second group from the top on the artboard. In the Links panel, with one of the Kayak.tif images selected, click the Relink button (Image) below the list of images.

Image

11. In the Place dialog box, navigate to the Lessons > Lesson14 > images folder and select People.psd. Make sure that the Link option is selected. Click Place to replace the kayak image with the People.psd image.


Image Tip

The new image is masked in the same shape. If you need to edit either the image or the clipping path, you could click the Edit Contents button (Image) or the Edit Clipping Path button (Image) in the Control panel.


When you replace an image, any color adjustments made to the original image are not applied to the replacement. However, masks applied to the original image are preserved. Any layer modes and transparency adjustments that you’ve made to other layers also may affect the image’s appearance.

Image

12. Click the third group from the top on the artboard. In the Links panel, with the Kayak.tif image selected, click the Relink button (Image) below the list of images.

13. In the Place dialog box, navigate to the Lessons > Lesson14 > images folder and select Hiking.jpg. Make sure that the Link option is selected. Click Place to replace the kayak image with the new image.

Image

14. Click the bottom group. In the Links panel, with one of the Kayak.tif images selected, click the Relink button (Image) below the list of images.

15. In the Place dialog box, navigate to the Lessons > Lesson14 > images folder and select Snorkel.psd. Make sure that the Link option is selected. Click Place to replace the kayak image with the Snorkel.psd image.

Image

16. Choose View > Smart Guides to turn them on.

17. Choose Select > Deselect. Click the top image group with the Kayak.tif image. Position the pointer just off the upper-right corner, and when you see the rotate arrows (Image), click and drag to the left until you see approximately 10° in the measurement label.

Image

18. Click the group with the People.psd image just below the top group and rotate the group to the right, until you see approximately –5° in the measurement label. Rotate the Hiking.jpg group to the left until you see approximately 10° in the measurement label. Rotate the Snorkel.psd image group to the right until you see approximately –10° in the measurement label.

Image


Image Note

The figure shows rotating the final image group.


19. Choose File > Save.

Packaging a file

When you package a file, you create a folder that contains a copy of the Illustrator document, any necessary fonts, copies of the linked graphics, and a report that contains information about the packaged files. This is an easy way to hand off all necessary files for an Illustrator project. Next, you will package the poster files.

1. Choose File > Package. In the Package dialog box, set the following options:

• Click the folder icon (Image), and navigate to the Lesson14 folder, if you are not already there. Click Choose (Mac OS) or Select Folder (Windows) to return to the Package dialog box.

• Folder name: GreenIsle (remove “_Folder” from the name)

• Options: Leave at default settings.


Image Note

If the file needs to be saved, a dialog box will appear to notify you.


2. Click Package.

The Copy Links option copies all the linked files to the new folder it creates. The Collect Links In Separate Folder option creates a folder called Links and copies the links into there. The Relink Linked Files To Document option updates the links within the Illustrator document to link to the new copies.

Image


Image Note

The Create Report option, when selected, will create a package report (summary) in the form of a .txt (text) file, which is placed in the package folder by default.


3. In the next dialog box that discusses font-licensing restrictions, click OK. Clicking Back would allow you to deselect Copy Fonts Used In Document (Except CJK & Typekit fonts).

4. In the final dialog box to appear, click Show Package to see the package folder.

In the package folder should be a folder called Links that contains all the linked images. The GreenIsle Report (.txt file) contains information about the document contents.

5. Return to Illustrator, and choose File > Close.

Review questions

1. Describe the difference between linking and embedding in Illustrator.

2. What kinds of objects can be used as masks?

3. How do you create an opacity mask for a placed image?

4. What color modifications can you apply to a selected object using effects?

5. Describe how to replace a placed image with another image in a document.

6. Describe what packaging does.

Review answers

1. A linked file is a separate, external file connected to the Illustrator file by a link. A linked file does not add significantly to the size of the Illustrator file. The linked file must accompany the Illustrator file to preserve the link and to ensure that the placed file appears when you open the Illustrator file. An embedded file is included in the Illustrator file. The Illustrator file size reflects the addition of the embedded file. Because the embedded file is part of the Illustrator file, no link can be broken. You can update linked and embedded files using the Relink button (Image) in the Links panel.

2. A mask can be a simple or compound path and masks (such as an opacity mask) may be imported with placed Photoshop files. You can also create layer clipping masks with any shape that is the topmost object of a group or layer.

3. You create an opacity mask by placing the object to be used as a mask on top of the object to be masked. Then you select the mask and the object(s) to be masked, and either click the Make Mask button in the Transparency panel or choose Make Opacity Mask from the Transparency panel menu.

4. You can use effects to change the color mode (RGB, CMYK, or grayscale) or to adjust individual colors in a selected object. You can also saturate or desaturate colors or invert colors in a selected object. You can apply color modifications to placed images, as well as to artwork created in Illustrator.

5. To replace a placed image with a different image, select the image in the Links panel. Then click the Relink button (Image), and locate and select the replacement image. Click Place.

6. Packaging is used to gather all of the necessary pieces for an Illustrator document. Packaging creates a copy of the Illustrator file, the linked images, and the necessary fonts (if desired), and it gathers the copies into a folder.