Techniques for Selecting Artwork - Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book 2015 release (2016) 

Adobe Illustrator CC Classroom in a Book 2015 release (2016)

2. Techniques for Selecting Artwork

Lesson overview

In this lesson, you’ll learn how to do the following:

• Differentiate between the various selection tools and use different selection techniques.

• Recognize Smart Guides.

• Save selections for future use.

• Use tools and commands to align shapes and points to each other and the artboard.

• Group and ungroup items.

• Work in Isolation mode.

• Arrange content.

• Select objects that are behind other objects.

• Hide and lock items for organizational purposes.

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This lesson takes approximately 45 minutes to complete.

Download the project files for this lesson from the Lesson & Update Files tab on your Account page at www.peachpit.com and store them on your computer in a convenient location, as described in the “Getting Started” section of this book.

Your Account page is also where you’ll find any updates to the chapters or to the lesson files. Look on the Lesson & Update Files tab to access the most current content.

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Selecting content in Adobe Illustrator is one of the more important things you’ll do. In this lesson, you learn how to locate and select objects using the Selection tools; protect other objects by grouping, hiding, and locking them; align objects to each other and the artboard; and much more.

Getting started

When changing colors or size and adding effects or attributes, you must first select the object to which you are applying the changes. In this lesson, you will learn the fundamentals of using the selection tools. More advanced selection techniques using layers are discussed in Lesson 9, “Organizing Your Artwork with Layers.”

1. To ensure that the tools and panels function exactly as described in this lesson, delete or deactivate (by renaming) the Adobe Illustrator CC preferences file. See “Restoring default preferences” in the “Getting Started” section at the beginning of the book.

2. Start Adobe Illustrator CC.


Image Note

If you have not already downloaded the project files for this lesson to your computer from your Account page, make sure to do so now. See “Getting Started” at the beginning of the book.


3. Choose File > Open, and open the L2_start.ai file in the Lesson02 folder, located in the Lessons folder on your hard disk.

4. Choose View > Fit All In Window.

5. Choose Window > Workspace > Essentials, make sure it’s selected, and then choose Window > Workspace > Reset Essentials to reset the workspace.

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Selecting objects

Whether you are creating artwork from scratch or editing existing artwork in Illustrator, you will need to become familiar with selecting objects. There are many methods and tools for doing this, and in this section, you’ll explore the most widely used, which includes the Selection (Image) and Direct Selection (Image) tools.

Using the Selection tool

The Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel lets you select, move, and resize entire objects. In this first section, you’ll become familiar with the tool.

1. Select the Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel, if it’s not already selected. Move the pointer over different shapes on the artboards, without clicking.

The icon that appears as you pass over objects (Image) indicates that there is artwork that can be selected under the pointer. When you hover over an object, that object is also outlined in a color like blue (in this instance).

2. Select the Zoom tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and click several times slowly on the two red circles on the artboard on the right to zoom in.

3. Select the Selection tool in the Tools panel, and then position the pointer over the black edge of the red circle on the left. A word such as “path” or “anchor” may appear, because Smart Guides are turned on by default.

Smart Guides are temporary snap-to guides that help you align, edit, and transform objects or artboards.


Image Tip

You’ll learn more about Smart Guides in Lesson 3, “Using Shapes to Create Artwork for a Postcard.”


4. Click anywhere inside the red circle on the left to select it. A bounding box with eight handles appears.

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The bounding box is used when making changes to artwork (vector or raster), such as resizing or rotating. The bounding box also indicates that an item is selected and ready to be modified, and the color of the bounding box indicates which layer the object is on. Layers are discussed more in Lesson 9.

5. Using the Selection tool, click in the red circle on the right. Notice that the left red circle is now deselected and only the right circle is selected.

6. Holding down the Shift key, click the left red circle to add it to the selection, and then release the key. Both red circles are now selected, and a larger bounding box surrounds them.

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Image Note

To select an item without a fill, you can click the stroke (the edge) or drag a selection marquee across the object.


7. Move the circles anywhere in the document by clicking inside either selected circle (in the red area) and dragging. Because both circles are selected, they move together.

As you drag, you may notice the magenta lines that appear. These are called alignment guides and are visible because Smart Guides are turned on (View > Smart Guides). As you drag, the objects are aligned to other objects on the artboard. Also notice the measurement label (gray box) next to the pointer that shows the object’s distance from its original position. Measurement labels also appear because Smart Guides are turned on.

8. Deselect the circles by clicking a blank area of the artboard or by choosing Select > Deselect.

9. Revert to the last saved version of the document by choosing File > Revert. In the dialog box that appears, click Revert.

Using the Direct Selection tool

In Illustrator, as you draw, you create vector paths that are made up of anchor points and paths. Anchor points are used to control the shape of the path and work like pins holding a wire in place. A shape you create, like a square, is composed of at least four anchor points on the corners with paths in between the anchor points. You change the shape of a path or shape by dragging its anchor points (among other things). The Direct Selection (Image) tool selects anchor points or path segments within an object so that it can be reshaped. Next, you will become familiar with selecting anchor points using the Direct Selection tool and reshaping a path.

1. Choose View > Fit All In Window.

2. Select the Zoom tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and click several times on the series of orange shapes below the red circles you selected previously to zoom in.

3. Select the Direct Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Without clicking, position the pointer over the top edge of one of the orange shapes. Move the pointer along the top edge of the shape until the word “anchor” appears by the pointer.

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Image Tip

You can also click in the middle of a shape to select it and to see the anchor points around its edge. This can be an easy way to see where the points are, and then you can click a point to select it.


When the Direct Selection tool is over an anchor point of a path or object, the word “anchor” appears. The “anchor” label is showing because Smart Guides are turned on (View > Smart Guides). Also notice the little white box to the right of the pointer. The small dot that appears in the center of the white box indicates that the cursor is positioned over an anchor point.

4. Click to select that anchor point.

Notice that only the anchor point you selected is solid (filled), indicating that it is selected, and the other anchor points in the shape are hollow, indicating that they are not selected. Also notice the small blue lines extending from the selected anchor point. These are called direction lines. The angle and length of the direction lines determine the shape and size of the curved segments. Moving the direction points (at the end of the direction lines) can reshape the path.

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5. With the Direct Selection tool still selected, drag the selected anchor point up to edit the shape of the object.


Image Note

The gray measurement label that appears as you drag the anchor point has the values dX and dY. dX indicates the distance that the pointer has moved along the x-axis (horizontal), and dY indicates the distance that the pointer has moved along the y-axis (vertical).


6. Try clicking another point on the edge of the shape, and notice that the previous point is deselected.

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7. Revert to the last saved version of the file by choosing File > Revert. In the dialog box that appears, click Revert.


Exploring selection and anchor point preferences

To display selection and anchor point preferences, choose

• Illustrator CC > Preferences > Selection & Anchor Display (Mac OS)

• Edit > Preferences > Selection & Anchor Display (Windows)

You can change the size of anchor points (called anchors in the dialog box) or the display of the direction handles (called handles in the dialog box), among other settings related to paths.

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Creating selections with a marquee

Another way to select content is by dragging a marquee around the objects that you want to select, which is what you’ll do next.

1. Choose View > Fit All In Window.

2. Select the Zoom tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and click three times, slowly, on the red circles.

3. Select the Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Position the pointer above and to the left of the leftmost red circle, and then drag downward and to the right to create a marquee that overlaps just the tops of the circles.

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Image Tip

When dragging with the Selection tool (Image), you need to encompass only a small part of an object to select it.


4. Choose Select > Deselect, or click where there are no objects.

Now you’ll use the Direct Selection tool to select multiple anchor points in the red circles by dragging a marquee around anchor points.

5. Select the Direct Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Starting off the top-left of the leftmost red circle (see the figure), drag across the top edges of the two circles. Only the top anchor points become selected.

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6. Click and drag one of the selected anchor points to see how the anchor points reposition together.


Image Note

Selecting points using this method might take some practice. You’ll need to drag across only the points you want selected; otherwise, more points will be selected. You can always click away from the objects to deselect them and then try again.


You can use this method when selecting points so that you don’t have to click exactly on the anchor point that you want to select.

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7. Revert to the last saved version of the file by choosing File > Revert. In the dialog box that appears, click Revert.

Selecting artwork with the Magic Wand tool

You can use the Magic Wand tool (Image) to select all objects in a document that have the same attributes, like a color fill. The fill is a color applied to the inside of an object. You can customize the Magic Wand tool to select objects based on options, like stroke weight, stroke color, and more, by double-clicking the Magic Wand tool in the Tools panel.

Next, you’ll select artwork with the Magic Wand tool.

1. Select the Selection tool (Image), and click in a blank area of the smaller artboard on the right. This makes that artboard the active artboard.

2. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

3. Select the Magic Wand tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Click one of the red circles on the right artboard, and notice that the other red circle becomes selected as well.

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No bounding box (a box surrounding the two shapes) appears because the Magic Wand tool is still selected.

4. Holding down the Shift key, notice that the pointer has a plus sign (+) next to it. Click one of the orange shapes (below the red shapes) with the Magic Wand tool, and then release the key.

This adds all of the shapes filled with that same orange color to the selection.

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5. With the Magic Wand tool still selected, hold down the Option key (Mac OS) or Alt key (Windows) and notice that a minus sign (–) appears next to the pointer. Click one of the orange shapes to deselect all of the shapes with that same fill, and then release the key. The red circles should still be selected.

6. Choose Select > Deselect, or click where there are no objects.

Selecting similar objects

You can also select objects based on similar fill color, stroke color, stroke weight, and more, using the Select Similar Objects button or the Select > Same command. The stroke of an object is the outline (border), and the stroke weight is the width of the stroke. Next, you will select several objects with the same fill and stroke applied.

1. Select the Selection tool (Image), and click to select one of the red circles.

2. Click the arrow to the right of the Select Similar Objects button (Image) in the Control panel to show a menu. Choose Fill Color to select all objects on any artboard with the same fill color (red) as the selected object.

Notice that the circles with the same red-colored fill are selected.

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3. Click to select one of the orange shapes, and then choose Select > Same > Fill & Stroke.

All of the orange-filled shapes with the same stroke and fill and are now selected.

If you know that you may need to reselect a series of objects again, like the orange objects, you can save the selection you make so that you can easily recall it later. Saved selections are saved only with that document. That’s what you’ll do next.

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4. With the orange shapes still selected, choose Select > Save Selection. Name the selection RobotMouth in the Save Selection dialog box, and click OK so that you’ll be able to choose this selection at a later time.

5. Choose Select > Deselect.


Image Tip

It is helpful to name selections according to use or function. If you name the selection “1 pt stroke,” for instance, the name may be misleading if you later change the stroke weight of the artwork.


Selecting in Outline mode

By default, Adobe Illustrator displays all artwork with their paint attributes, like fill and stroke, showing. However, you can choose to display artwork so that only outlines (or paths) are visible. The next method for selecting involves viewing artwork in Outline mode and can be very useful if you want to select objects within a series of stacked objects.

1. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window to fit the artboard with the orange shapes into the Document window, if necessary.

2. With the Selection tool (Image), click within the gray half-circle shape at the bottom of the artboard to select it. This will become the body of the robot.

Since the shape has a fill (a color, pattern, or gradient filling the inside of an object), you can click anywhere within the bounds of the object to select it.

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3. Choose Select > Deselect to deselect the shape.

4. Choose View > Outline to view the artwork as outlines.

5. With the Selection tool, click inside that same half-circle shape.

Notice that you cannot select the object using this method. Outline mode displays artwork as outlines with no fill. To select in Outline mode, you can click the edge of the object or drag a marquee across the shape to select it.

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6. Click the Previous artboard button (Image) in the lower-left corner of the Document window to fit the first artboard in the window.

7. On the left artboard, with the Selection tool selected, drag a marquee across the right (smaller) ellipse that makes the robot’s eye. Press the Left Arrow key several times to move the ellipse so that it almost touches the ellipse to the left.

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8. Choose View > GPU Preview or View > Preview On CPU, if not available, to see the painted artwork.

Aligning objects

Illustrator makes it easy to align or distribute multiple objects relative to each other, the artboard, or a key object. In this section, you’ll explore the different options for aligning objects.

Aligning objects to each other

One type of alignment is aligning objects to each other, and that’s what you’ll do next.

1. Choose Select > RobotMouth to reselect the orange shapes.

2. Click the Next artboard button (Image) in the lower-left corner of the Document window to fit the artboard with the orange and red shapes in the window.

3. Select the Zoom tool (Image) in the Tools panel, and click several times on the orange-filled shapes to zoom in.

4. Choose Align To Selection from the Align To button (Image) in the Control panel, if it’s not already selected, to ensure that the selected objects are aligned to each other.

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5. Click the Vertical Align Bottom button (Image) in the Control panel.

Notice that the bottom edges of all the orange objects move to align with the lowest orange object.

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6. Choose Edit > Undo Align to return the objects to their original positions. Leave the objects selected for the next section.


Image Note

The Align options may not appear in the Control panel. If you don’t see the Align options, click the word “Align” in the Control panel to open the Align panel. The number of options displayed in the Control panel depends on your screen resolution.


Aligning to a key object

key object is an object that you want other objects to align to. You specify a key object by selecting all the objects you want to align, including the key object, and then clicking the key object again. When selected, the key object has a thick outline, and the Align To Key Object icon (Image) appears in the Control panel and the Align panel. Next, you will align the orange shapes.

1. With the orange shapes still selected, click the leftmost shape with the Selection tool (Image).

The thick blue outline indicates that the leftmost shape is the key object that other objects will align to.

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Image Note

The key object outline color is determined by the layer color that the object is on.



Image Tip

In the Align panel, you can choose Show Options from the panel menu (Image) and then choose Align To Key Object from the Align To option. The object that is in front becomes the key object.


2. Click the Vertical Align Top button (Image) in the Align options in the Control panel. Notice that all of the orange shapes move to align to the top edge of the key object.

3. Choose Select > Deselect.

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Image Note

To stop aligning and distributing relative to an object, click the object again to remove the blue outline, or choose Cancel Key Object from the Align panel menu (Image).


Aligning anchor points

Next, you’ll align two anchor points to each other using the Align options. Like setting a key object in the previous section, you can also set a key anchor point that other anchor points will align to.

1. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

2. Select the Direct Selection tool (Image), and click the lower-left corner point of the gray half-circle at the bottom of the artboard. Shift-click to select the lower-right point of the same gray half-circle (see the following figure).

You select the points in a specific order because the last selected anchor point is the key anchor point. Other points align to this point.

3. Click the Vertical Align Top button (Image) in the Control panel. The first anchor point selected aligns to the second anchor point selected.

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4. Choose Select > Deselect.

Distributing objects

Distributing objects using the Align panel enables you to select multiple objects and distribute the spacing between the centers or edges of those objects equally. Next, you will make the spacing between the orange shapes even.

1. Select the Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel. Choose Select > RobotMouth to reselect all the orange shapes.

2. Click the Horizontal Distribute Center button (Image) in the Control panel.

Distributing moves all the orange shapes so that the spacing between the center of each of them is equal.

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Image Note

Using the Horizontal Distribute Center or Vertical Distribute Center button distributes the spacing equally between the centers of the objects. If the selected objects are not the same size, unexpected results may occur.


3. Choose Edit > Undo Align.

4. Choose Select > Deselect.

5. Choose View > Zoom In, twice, to zoom in to the orange shapes.

6. With the Selection tool selected, hold down the Shift key and drag the rightmost orange shape slightly to the left. Stop dragging just before the shape touches the orange shape to its left. Release the mouse button and then the key.

The Shift key keeps the shape aligned vertically with the other shapes.

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7. Choose Select > RobotMouth to select all of the orange shapes again, and then click the Horizontal Distribute Center button (Image) again. Notice that, with the rightmost shape repositioned, the objects move to redistribute the spacing between the centers.

8. Choose Select > Deselect.

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Image Note

When distributing objects horizontally, make sure that the leftmost and rightmost objects are where you want them, and then distribute the objects between them. For vertical distribution, position the topmost and bottommost objects, and then distribute the objects between them.


Aligning to the artboard

You can also align content to the artboard rather than to a selection or a key object. Aligning to the artboard aligns each selected object separately to the artboard. Next, you’ll get the gray half-circle shape on the artboard with the rest of the robot and align it to the bottom center of the artboard.

1. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, click the gray half-circle shape at the bottom of the artboard to select it. Choose Edit > Cut.

2. Click the Previous artboard button (Image) in the lower-left corner of the Document window to navigate to the first (left) artboard in the document, which contains the robot head.

3. Choose Edit > Paste to paste the gray half-circle.

4. Click the Align To Selection button (Image) in the Control panel, and choose Align To Artboard in the menu that appears. Selected content will now align to the artboard.

5. Click the Horizontal Align Center button (Image) (just in case), and then click the Vertical Align Bottom button (Image) to align the selection to the horizontal center and vertical bottom of the artboard.

6. Choose Select > Deselect.

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Image Tip

If you need a refresher on the Align To Selection button, refer to the “Aligning objects to each other” section.


Working with groups

You can combine objects into a group so that the objects are treated as a single unit. This way, you can move or transform a number of objects without affecting their individual attributes or positions relative to each other.

Grouping items

Next, you will select multiple objects and create a group from them.

1. Choose View > Fit All In Window to see both artboards.

2. Choose Select > RobotMouth to reselect the series of orange shapes.

3. Choose Object > Group, and notice that the word “Group” appears in the Selection Indicator on the left side of the Control panel with the shapes still selected.

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4. Choose Select > Deselect.

5. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, click one of the orange shapes in the group. Because they are grouped together, all are now selected.

6. Drag the group of orange shapes onto the robot head (below the eyes).

7. Choose Select > Deselect.

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Image Tip

One way to select the objects in a group individually is to select the group and then choose Object > Ungroup. This ungroups them permanently.


Working in Isolation mode

Isolation mode isolates groups (or sublayers) so that you can easily select and edit specific objects or parts of objects without having to ungroup the objects. When in Isolation mode, all objects outside of the isolated group are locked and dimmed so that they aren’t affected by the edits you make.

Next, you will edit a group using Isolation mode.

1. With the Selection tool (Image), click the robot’s hand at the end of the longer arm. You will see that it selects a group of shapes that make up the hand.

2. Double-click a shape in that hand to enter Isolation mode.

3. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window, and notice that the rest of the content in the document appears dimmed (you can’t select it).

At the top of the Document window, a gray bar appears with the words “Layer 1” and “<Group>.” This indicates that you have isolated a group of objects that is on Layer 1. You will learn more about layers in Lesson 9.


Image Tip

To enter Isolation mode, you can also select a group with the Selection tool and then click the Isolate Selected Object button (Image) in the Control panel.


4. Choose View > Smart Guides to turn them off. Smart guides make it so that content snap-aligns to other content, and right now you don’t want that.

5. Drag the light-gray circle down to approximately match the position of the circle shape in the other hand.

When you enter Isolation mode, groups are temporarily ungrouped. This enables you to edit objects in the group or to add new content without having to ungroup.

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6. Double-click outside of the shapes within the group to exit Isolation mode.


Image Tip

To exit Isolation mode, you can also click the gray arrow in the upper-left corner of the Document window or deselect all content and click the Exit Isolation Mode button (Image) in the Control panel. You can also press the Escape key when in Isolation mode or double-click a blank area of the Document window to exit Isolation mode.


7. Click to select the same circle shape. Notice that it is once again grouped with the rest of the shapes in the hand, and you can also select other objects.

8. Choose Select > Deselect.

Creating a nested group

Groups can also be nested—grouped within other objects or grouped to form larger groups. Nesting is a common technique used when designing artwork. It’s a great way to keep associated content together.

In this section, you will explore how to create a nested group.

1. With the Selection tool (Image), drag a marquee across the series of black shapes below the hand that make up the longer arm of the robot.

2. Choose Object > Group.

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3. With the Selection tool, Shift-click the hand above the arm to select that group as well. Choose Object > Group.

You have created a nested group—a group that is combined with other objects or groups to form a larger group.

4. Choose Select > Deselect.

5. With the Selection tool, click one of the grouped objects in that same arm. All objects in the nested group become selected.

6. Click a blank area on the artboard to deselect the objects.

Selecting using the Group Selection tool

Instead of ungrouping a group to select the content within, the Group Selection tool (Image) lets you select an object within a group, a single group within multiple groups, or a set of groups within the artwork. Next, you will explore the Group Selection (Image) tool.

1. Hold down on the Direct Selection tool (Image) in the Tools panel to reveal more tools. Click the Group Selection tool (Image) to select it. The Group Selection tool adds the object’s parent group(s) to the current selection.

2. Click one of the shapes in the same robot hand to select it. Click again, on the same shape, to select the object’s parent group (the group of hand shapes). Click once more, on that same shape, to select the group composed of the hand and arm. The Group Selection tool adds each group to the selection in the order in which it was grouped.

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3. Choose Select > Deselect.

4. With the Selection tool (Image), click any of the objects in the nested group to select the group. Choose Object > Ungroup to ungroup the objects.

5. Choose Select > Deselect.

6. Click to select the hand. Notice that it is still a group of objects.


Image Note

To ungroup all of the selected objects, even the hand and arm shapes, you would choose Object > Ungroup twice.


Exploring object arrangement

As you create objects, Illustrator stacks them in order on the artboards, beginning with the first object created. The order in which objects are stacked (called stacking order) determines how they display when they overlap. You can change the stacking order of objects in your artwork at any time, using either the Layers panel or Object > Arrange commands.


Image Tip

To learn more about objects and stacking order, see the PDF “Stack_order.pdf” in the Lessons > Lesson_extras folder.


Arranging objects

Next, you will work with the Arrange commands to change how objects are stacked.

1. Choose View > Fit All In Window to see both artboards in the document.

2. With the Selection tool (Image) selected, click to select the black shape below the robot’s head (the robot’s “neck”).

3. Choose Object > Arrange > Send To Back to send the shape behind the robot’s head.

4. Click to select either of the red circles on the right artboard.

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5. Drag the selected circle on top of the smaller eye for the robot. Release the mouse, and notice that the red circle disappears, but it’s still selected.

It went behind the ellipse (the eye) because it was probably created before the eye shape, which means it is lower in the stacking order.

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6. With the red circle still selected, choose Object > Arrange > Bring To Front. This brings the red circle to the front of the stack, making it the topmost object.

Selecting objects behind

When you stack objects on top of each other, sometimes it becomes difficult to select objects that are underneath other objects. Next, you will learn how to select an object through a stack of objects.

1. With the Selection tool (Image), select the other red circle on the right artboard, drag it onto the larger robot eye shape on the left artboard, and then release the mouse.

Notice that this circle disappears like the other but is still selected. This time, you will deselect the circle and then reselect it using another method.

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2. Choose Select > Deselect, and the red circle is no longer selected.

3. With the pointer positioned over the location of the second red circle you just deselected, the one behind the eye shape, hold down the Command (Mac OS) or Ctrl (Windows) key, and click until the circle is selected again (this may take several clicks).

Image


Image Note

You may see an angle bracket displayed with the pointer (Image).



Image Note

To select the hidden red circle, make sure that you click where the circle and the eye overlap. Otherwise, you won’t be able to select the red circle.


4. Choose Object > Arrange > Bring To Front to bring the circle on top of the eye.

5. Choose Select > Deselect.

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Hiding and locking objects

When working on complex artwork, it may become more difficult to make selections. In this section, you’ll learn how to lock and hide content to make selecting objects easier.

1. Choose View > Fit Artboard In Window.

2. Choose Object > Show All to reveal a mask over the robot’s eyes. Choose Object > Arrange > Bring To Front to bring the mask to the front.


Image Tip

To learn more selection techniques, see the PDF named “Selections.pdf” in the Lesson_extras folder in the Lessons folder.


3. With the Selection tool (Image), click to attempt to select one of the eyes.

Notice that you can’t, since the mask is on top of them. In order to access the eyes, you could use one of the methods we previously discussed or use one of two other methods: hide or lock.

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4. With the mask still selected, choose Object > Hide > Selection, or press Command+3 (Mac OS) or Ctrl+3 (Windows). The mask is hidden so that you can more easily select other objects. (This is how I hid the mask when I set up the file.)

5. Click to select one of the red circles in the eyes, and move it.

6. Choose Object > Show All to show the mask again.

7. With the mask selected, choose Object > Lock > Selection, or press Command+2 (Mac OS) or Ctrl+2 (Windows).

The mask is still visible, but you cannot select it.

8. With the Selection tool, click to select one of the eye shapes.

9. Choose Object > Unlock All, and then choose Object > Hide > Selection to hide the mask again.

10. Choose View > Smart Guides to turn them on.

11. Choose File > Save to save the file, and then choose File > Close.

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Review questions

1. How can you select an object that has no fill?

2. Explain two ways you can select an item in a group without choosing Object > Ungroup.

3. Of the two Selection tools (Selection [Image] and Direct Selection [Image]), which allows you to edit the individual anchor points of an object?

4. What should you do after creating a selection that you are going to use repeatedly?

5. Sometimes you are unable to select an object because it is underneath another object. Explain two ways to get around this issue.

6. To align objects to the artboard, what do you need to first select in the Align panel or Control panel before you choose an alignment option?

Review answers

1. You can select an object that has no fill by clicking the stroke or by dragging a marquee across any part of the object.

2. Using the Group Selection tool (Image), you can click once to select an individual item within a group. Click again to add the next grouped items to the selection. Read Lesson 9, “Organizing Your Artwork with Layers,” to see how you can use layers to make complex selections. You can also double-click the group to enter Isolation mode, edit the shapes as needed, and then exit Isolation mode by pressing the Escape key or by double-clicking outside of the group.

3. Using the Direct Selection tool (Image), you can select one or more individual anchor points and make changes to the shape of an object.

4. For any selection that you anticipate using again, choose Select > Save Selection. Name the selection so that you can reselect it at any time from the Select menu.

5. If your access to an object is blocked, you can choose Object > Hide > Selection to hide the blocking object. The object is not deleted. It is just hidden in the same position until you choose Object > Show All. You can also use the Selection tool (Image) to select an object that’s behind other objects by pressing the Command (Mac OS) or Ctrl (Windows) key and then clicking the overlapping objects until the object you want to select is selected.

6. To align objects to an artboard, first select the Align To Artboard option.