Learn Python in One Day and Learn It Well (2015)

Appendix C: Working With Tuples

=> marks the start of the output

del

Delete the entire tuple

[Example]

myTuple = (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’)

del myTuple

print (myTuple)

=> NameError: name 'myTuple' is not defined

in

Check if an item is in a tuple

[Example]

myTuple = (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’)

‘c’ in myTuple

=> True

‘e’ in myTuple

=> False

len( )

Find the number of items in a tuple

[Example]

myTuple = (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’)

print (len(myTuple))

=> 4

Addition Operator: +

Concatenate Tuples

[Example]

myTuple = (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’)

print (myTuple + (‘e’, ‘f’))

=> (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’, ‘e’, ‘f’)

print (myTuple)

=> (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’)

Multiplication Operator: *

Duplicate a tuple and concatenate it to the end of the tuple

[Example]

myTuple = (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’)

print(myTuple*3)

=> ('a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd', 'a', 'b', 'c', 'd')

print (myTuple)

=> (‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’)

Note: The + and * symbols do not modify the tuple. The tuple stays as [‘a’, ‘b’, ‘c’, ‘d’] in both cases.